raise (someone or something) from the dead

(redirected from raising him from the dead)

raise (someone or something) from the dead

1. To resurrect or reanimate a deceased person or animal. He uttered an ancient mystic spell meant to raise his son from the dead. The warlock raised all manner of creature from the dead and unleashed the unholy horde upon the world.
2. To return something to viability or give something the chance to succeed after it has failed or been considered a failure. The movie had been canceled by the studio, but a massive petition by fans seems to have raised it from the dead. The billionaire investor raised the old company from the dead with the aim of returning it to its former glory.
See also: dead, raise
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

raise someone from the dead

Fig. to bring a dead person back to life. (When used figuratively, usually refers to something very bad or offensive.) How great are your magic powers? Can you raise people from the dead? They say her singing could raise people from the dead.
See also: dead, raise
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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References in periodicals archive ?
He is likewise obedient to the Son when he hears and responds to Jesus' suffering by raising him from the dead. Drawing on the "polyphony of scripture," Hinze illustrates the obedience of all three persons to one another and draws on this model to present a compelling ecclesiology of prophetic listening and response as the calling of all the people of God.
(30) While God has overlooked the times of human ignorance, now he commands all people everywhere to repent, (31) because he has fixed a day on which he will have the world judged in righteousness by a man whom he has appointed, and of this he has given assurance to all by raising him from the dead." (32) When they heard of the resurrection of the dead, some scoffed; but others said, "We will hear you again about this." (33) At that point Paul left them.
The catalyst for this second project was Tintoretto's "Lazarus," but neither he nor the New Testament miracle of Jesus raising him from the dead is the subject of this collection of essays.
In her remarks during the graduation, she thanked Jesus for "dying for our sins" and thanked God for "raising him from the dead three days later so that through your son's death we may be at peace with you and thereby may have fellowship with you."
Although he has stated in the passion predictions that is "necessary" for him to be rejected, suffer, and die, there is nothing in the text to suggest that God deems his death "necessary" or that this is "God's will." Rather, his faithfulness in the passion narrative is expressed in his willingness to endure the machinations of the imperial system that God will triumph over by raising him from the dead. The connection with the faithfulness of his followers was indicated already in 3:35: "whoever does the will of God is my brother, and sister, and mother."
Peter further points to Jesus, the one whom God glorified by raising him from the dead. This is the one whose "name itself has made this man strong."