raise an objection (to someone or something)

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raise an objection

To vocalize one's objection to or protest against something. If no one raises an objection, we will consider the issue closed for the purposes of our meeting. The legal team for the defendant raised an objection to the prosecutor's line of questioning.
See also: objection, raise

raise an objection (to someone or something)

To make one's opposition to or disapproval of someone or something known or heard. Her parents raised an objection to the wedding because of her fiancé's reputation. We won't raise any objections, so long as it's understood that your firm will be covering all the applicable fees.
See also: objection, raise, someone
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

raise (an) objection (to someone or something)

to mention an objection about someone or something. I hope your family won't raise an objection to my staying for dinner. I'm certain no one will raise an objection. We are delighted to have you.
See also: objection, raise
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

raise an objection

Protest, as in I'll raise no objections to your proposed bill if you promise to support me next time. The use of raise in the sense of "bring up" or "mention" dates from the mid-1600s.
See also: objection, raise
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Hiroki Imazato, the president of Overseas Petroleum and later the president of JODCO, raises an objection to the $780 million stake purchase: "If JODCO purchased these oil fields at such a high price," he notes, "it would fail to run its business." But the Japanese government, which maintained a policy holding that Japan should obtain as many self-production oil fields as it could, urged Overseas Petroleum to close the deal with BP, the former stakeholder in the oil fields.