raise the wind

raise the wind

obsolete To raise the money to fund some project or activity. Primarily heard in UK. He's been seeking investors to raise the wind for his proposed textile business.
See also: raise, wind

raise the wind

obtain money for a purpose. British
When it first entered the language in medieval times, this phrase referred to the belief that spirits or witches were able to cause the winds to blow in order to help or hinder ships; the figurative use dates from the late 18th century.
See also: raise, wind
References in classic literature ?
Whatever some people may think, I am very certain it is in the power of witches to raise the wind whenever they please.
As it was, our bonnets were so unbecoming, and the mills were so occupied in trying to raise the wind, that I never had even a flirtation with anybody.
Our grandmothers threw their caps over the mills, of course, but, by Jove, their granddaughters only throw their caps over mills that can raise the wind for them.
No, we must raise the wind to-night and re-open your account first thing to-morrow.
941 MW, and the government intends to raise the wind power to a level as high as 6650 MW until 2020.
Margaret Thatcher tried to endear us to private health, but the majority of us couldn't raise the wind.
There is the sailor Edward Robarts, the first of the beachcombers who would have a 'royal bride', umpteen adventures as a various go-between, and who would eventually write his narrative--'anything to raise the wind for an honest morsel', as a sailor would say.