raise one's hackles

raise (one's) hackles

To greatly irritate, annoy, or aggravate one. The disrespect he showed our professor during class raised my hackles so badly that I had to go take a walk to calm down. The politician has a gift for raising his opponents' hackles during debates.
See also: hackle, raise

raise one's hackles

Make one very angry, as in That really raised my hackles when he pitched straight at the batter's head. Hackles are the hairs on the back of an animal's neck, which stick up when the animal feels fearful or angry. [Late 1800s]
See also: hackle, raise

raise one's hackles, to

To arouse one’s anger. The hackles are the hair on the back of an animal’s neck that sticks straight up with excitement, fear, or other strong emotion. “With the hackles up,” meaning on the point of fighting, was transferred to humans in the late nineteenth century. “I almost saw the hackles of a good old squire rise,” wrote Edward Pennell-Elmhirst (The Cream of Leicestershire, 1883).
See also: raise
References in periodicals archive ?
The alleged finding of larvae in powder milk some time back did raise one's hackles. But such revelations seem to have become routine these days with the initial dismay at the 'shocking finding' translating into an anger that soon gives way to a feeling of exasperation faced with the sheer enormity of the situation.
To know a common mistake is to raise one's hackles on each and every occasion of its perpetration.