ragged

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rag the puck

1. In ice hockey, to attempt to run out the remaining time in a game by maintaining possession of the puck for as long possible. The team is notorious for ragging the puck whenever they take the lead.
2. By extension, to stall, postpone, or otherwise cause a delay by deliberately engaging in time-wasting activities. Primarily heard in Canada. Activist groups are claiming that the government has ragged the puck in relation to legislation that would better protect the environment. Quit ragging the puck, John, and make a decision already!
See also: puck, rag

be on the ragged edge

To be close to encountering or experiencing something (such as an outcome or emotional state). Primarily heard in US. After taking exams all week, I am on the ragged edge of exhaustion. The board has been on the ragged edge of discord ever since learning about the chairman's scandalous conduct.
See also: edge, on, ragged

run (oneself or someone) ragged

To exhaust oneself or someone else through hard work or effort. I've been running myself ragged trying to clean and organize the house before your mom comes to visit. If you become Joe's personal assistant, don't be surprised if he runs you ragged—he can be very demanding.
See also: ragged, run

be run ragged

To be utterly exhausted from long, tedious work or having too many things to do. I've been run ragged trying to clean and organize the house before your mom comes to visit. I love this work—you're run ragged at the end of the day, but you feel like you've done something truly productive.
See also: ragged, run

rag on (one)

1. To nag, criticize, or berate one, especially at length. I wish you'd quit ragging on me—I told you I was sorry! The boss started ragging on Thomas in front of the whole office for messing up the Roberston accounts.
2. To tease or mock one. My friends are always ragging on me for wearing a backpack that has My Little Pony on it. We rag on each other constantly, but it's all in good fun.
See also: on, rag

bullyrag

To bother or badger someone. Would you quit bullyragging me? I didn't do anything wrong, I swear!

rag out

1. slang To get dressed up in formal or fancy clothes. Often used in passive constructions. It's a pretty informal ceremony—you don't have to rag out or anything. I love getting ragged out for special occasions.
2. slang To scold, reprimand, or berate someone, especially with undue intensity or aggression. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "rag" and "out." It's a pretty informal ceremony—you don't have to rag out or anything. I love getting ragged out for special occasions.
See also: out, rag

rag about

1. slang To complain or gripe very intensely or incessantly about someone or something. We've been ragging about this issue for so long that it's a huge relief to find out they're actually going to fix it! Instead of just ragging about your annoying coworker, why don't you actually try to resolve the issue with them?
2. slang To tease, mock, or annoy someone about some issue or thing. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "rag" and "out." My friends are always ragging me about my pink backpack, but I quite like it. OK, Tom, stop ragging Sally about her new boyfriend. You've embarrassed her enough already.
See also: rag

talk (oneself) ragged

To talk until one becomes exhausted or has nothing left to say. I had been talking myself ragged about the issue for nearly an hour. My sister was really distraught about her breakup, so I just gave her a sympathetic ear while she talked herself ragged.
See also: ragged, talk

talk (one) ragged

To talk so much that one becomes bored and exhausted from listening. I went on a date with a girl last night, but she talked me ragged during dinner and I ended up leaving early. You need to keep your presentations varied and interesting. You can't just talk your audience ragged for an hour.
See also: ragged, talk

rag Out

 Sl. to dress up. I like to rag out and go to parties. I hate to rag out. I like comfortable clothes. rag someone about someone or something
1. to complain to someone about someone or something. Why are you always ragging me about Mary? Stop ragging me about being late.
2. to tease someone about someone or something. I wish you would stop ragging me about my hat. Why do you always rag me about my funny walk? I can't help it.
See also: out, rag

run someone ragged

Fig. to keep someone or something very busy. This busy season is running us all ragged at the store. What a busy day. I ran myself ragged.
See also: ragged, run

talk someone ragged

Fig. to talk to someone too much; to bore someone. That was not an interview. She talked me ragged. He always talks me ragged, but I always listen.
See also: ragged, talk

run one ragged

Exhaust one, as in I've run myself ragged with this project. This idiom alludes to working so hard that one's appearance is reduced to rags. [c. 1920]
See also: one, ragged, run

run someone ragged

If someone runs you ragged, they make you do so much that you get extremely tired. Most days the kids — four under the age of six — run me ragged. Their defence was run ragged by the opposing team. Note: You can also say that you run yourself ragged, meaning that you get very tired by doing many things. She runs herself ragged trying to get everything done.
See also: ragged, run, someone

run someone ragged

exhaust someone by making them undertake a lot of physical activity.
See also: ragged, run, someone

ˌrun somebody ˈragged

(informal) make somebody do a lot of work or make a big effort so that they become tired: You look really exhausted. Have the children been running you ragged?
See also: ragged, run, somebody

bullyrag

(ˈbʊliræg)
tv. & in. to harass someone. Don’t bullyrag me just because you’re upset.

rag out

in. to dress up. I hate to rag out. I like comfortable clothes.
See also: out, rag

talk someone ragged

tv. to talk to someone too much; to bore someone. That was not an interview. She talked me ragged.
See also: ragged, someone, talk
References in periodicals archive ?
2) and by Harpending's (1994) raggedness index (r) which was non-significant (r = 0.107, P = 0.070).
Poor naked wretches, wheresoe'er you are, That bide the pelting of this pitiless storm, How shall your unhoused heads and your unfed sides, Your loop'd and window'd raggedness, defend you From seasons such as these?
It gave the Insight a diminutive appearance compared to many vehicles that show off their big tires as a sign of raggedness.
Matthew Pugh, "Deconstruction, Onto-Theology and Thomas's Via Negativa," shows that Thomas's account of being and transcendence is supple enough to affirm both the reality of things, the existence of God, as well as the raggedness of our knowledge of and encounter with beings and the divine.
Carlyon, however, has been there and has felt the raggedness under foot and has visited the scenes of much of the fighting.
There's not one mistake, not one skosh of raggedness, and not one moment of joy, just a pristine, made-for TV production with a lifelessness that's inescapable.
We forgot in that moment all our weariness and fasting and raggedness!"
The technique of the impressionist artist further embodies that paradox: "Even this image of utter satisfaction must show its own artifice, its fragility, its readiness to dissolve into paint, the raggedness of desire."
Although the pattern of clothing imagery in King Lear--the gorgeousness of Regan's array, Kent's disguise, the "looped and windowed raggedness" of poor Tom, the "unbuttoning" of Lear himself--has received considerable scholarly attention, (10) the Pauline imperative to divest the Old Man and invest the New has not.
Having rolled back welfare, having stopped every effort to win national health insurance, having taken massive steps toward eliminating affirmative action, the right now looks out at the world it has created and finds in the raggedness of its cruelty a mandate for abolishing the welfare state altogether.
From one youth's suffering, he comes to pity the huddled masses of his kingdom in his extraordinary lines: Poor naked wretches, whereso'er you are, That bide the pelting of this pitiless storm, How shall your houseless heads and unfed sides, Your loop'd and window'd raggedness, defend you From seasons such as these?
The DTG-6000 Digital Test Gauge provides raggedness and accuracy for field pressure measurement and calibration applications.
The raggedness provides a visual cue about the position of the next line.
The sheer raggedness of the plotting -- and the pic's cynical disdain toward audiences -- is staggering, with no dramatic benefits emerging from the beam-me-up script.
This raggedness extends also to the author's familiarity with the relevant secondary literature.