radiate from

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radiate from someone or something

to spread out from someone or something, as with rays. Happiness radiated from Mary. She was so proud! The heat radiated from the wall next to the furnace room.
References in periodicals archive ?
Guo's team has even been able to make a filament radiate partially polarized light, which until now has been impossible to do without special filters that reduce the bulb's efficiency.
5 : to show very clearly <She radiates confidence.
The partnership with Radiate will provide Mango with the opportunity for greater exposure to the many brands that work with the companies in the Radiate Group.
Furthermore, there are nerve bundles directly under each rib, which is why any rib injury can radiate pain into the back.
personal computers, PDAs, phones, microwave ovens, any consumer electronics, light bulbs, and so on) radiates equal if not more energy into the noise floor.
The group decided to formally create the Radiate Internet Roundtable (RIR) to provide industry leadership in key Internet issues.
The electron, he decided, could not radiate energy except in intact quanta, each of which represented a large amount of emergy on the atomic scale.
And in the evening, these dark-colored buildings and roads also radiate the solar energy absorbed during the day, keeping the area warm when it should be cooling down.
SALT LAKE CITY -- Radiate Media is proud to announce the addition of Ivan Shulman as Executive Vice President of Sales and Chief Revenue Officer.
Radiated susceptibility (RS) standard test procedures foresee to radiate the units and their interconnecting cables by assigned radio-frequency (RF) field levels and to monitor equipment operation in order to detect possible degradationof performance.
But on the scale of individual planets or stars, there is more ordinary matter: That's because baryons can radiate away their energy (ridding" them of heat that would fight gravity) and therefore clump move tightly under the influence of gravity than can dark matter (which can't radiate), says theorist Piero Madau of the University of California, Santa Cruz.
We radiate our influence perpetually into the environment through our every thought, speech and action.
This experiment investigates how different colors, surfaces, and materials affect an object's ability to absorb and radiate heat.
6[degrees], the hypothalamus signals the heart to beat harder and faster, the blood vessels to expand at the skin's surface to help radiate heat, and sweat glands to kick into gear to cool the skin by evaporation.