rabbit

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horse and rabbit stew

A situation comprised of both crude or unpleasant things as well as those which are pleasing or beneficial, usually with the former in greater proportion to the latter. Used especially in reference to economics or business. The prime minister's plan for the economic recovery is little more than horse and rabbit stew, with a few token stimulus incentives greatly outweighed by draconian austerity measures.
See also: and, horse, rabbit, stew

go down the rabbit hole

To enter into a situation or begin a process or journey that is particularly strange, problematic, difficult, complex, or chaotic, especially one that becomes increasingly so as it develops or unfolds. (An allusion to Alice's Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll.) Owning your own business is a huge responsibility that not everyone is prepared for. Are you sure you're ready to go down the rabbit hole? I've stayed away from drugs and alcohol since coming to college. I have an addictive personality, so I decided to just avoid going down that rabbit hole altogether. Overhauling the current tax legislation is a rabbit hole I don't think this administration should go down at this point.
See also: down, go, hole, rabbit

rabbit hole

A situation, journey, or process that is particularly strange, problematic, difficult, complex, or chaotic, especially one that becomes increasingly so as it develops or unfolds. An allusion to Alice's Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll, it is used especially in the phrase "(go) down the rabbit hole." Overhauling the current tax legislation is a rabbit hole I don't think this administration should go down at this point. I've stayed away from drugs and alcohol since coming to college. I have an addictive personality, so I decided to just avoid that rabbit hole altogether.
See also: hole, rabbit

the rabbit died

The woman to whom we are referring is pregnant; the pregnancy test was positive. (From an early pregnancy test developed in 1931 in which the urine of a woman thought to be pregnant was injected into a female rabbit; if the woman was pregnant, the rabbit's ovaries would react. A common misconception at the time was that the rabbit would die if the woman was pregnant, hence the expression.) I saw Carol shopping for maternity clothes in the mall the other day. I guess the rabbit died! Honey, the rabbit died! It looks like we're going to have a baby!
See also: die, rabbit

breed like rabbits

slang To have several babies in a short period of time. (Rabbits are known to produce a large number of offspring very rapidly.) I can't believe my sister is pregnant for the fourth time in five years. She and her husband just breed like rabbits!
See also: breed, like, rabbit

pull a rabbit out of a hat

To do something surprising and seemingly impossible; to produce something in a way that has no obvious explanation, as if done by magic. A reference to the magician's trick of literally pulling a live rabbit out of a hat. The caterer really pulled a rabbit out of a hat by producing 100 cupcakes with just 20 minutes' notice. Unless someone can pull a rabbit out of a hat, we're out of solutions.
See also: hat, of, out, pull, rabbit

pull a rabbit out of (one's)/the hat

To do something surprising and seemingly impossible; to produce something in a way that has no obvious explanation, as if done by magic. A reference to the clichéd magician's trick of pulling a live rabbit out of a seemingly empty hat. The caterers really pulled a rabbit out of the hat by producing 100 cupcakes with just 20 minutes' notice. Unless someone can pull a rabbit out of their hat, I just don't see how we can fix the issue without starting the whole thing over again from scratch.
See also: hat, of, out, pull, rabbit

buy the rabbit

To be unsuccessful or have misfortune. I went into my presentation totally unprepared and bought the rabbit.
See also: buy, rabbit

let the dog see the rabbit

To remove unnecessary obstructions, impediments, or restrictions so as to allow someone or something to work the way want or are meant to. An allusion to greyhound racing, in which the dogs chase a live or mechanical rabbit around the race track. Every artistic decision we make in the movie has to go back and be approved by the head office. I wish they'd let the dog see the rabbit and just let us get on with it! You've added too many bells and whistles to the whole process. Focus on creating a clean, simple user interface and let the dog see the rabbit.
See also: dog, let, rabbit, see

like a rabbit (caught) in (the) headlights

In a state or manner of paralyzing surprise, fear, or bewilderment. Likened to the tendency of rabbits to freeze in place in front of an oncoming vehicle. When she asked me to marry her, I could only stand there like a rabbit caught in headlights. He froze like a rabbit in the headlights when I caught him taking money out of the register.
See also: headlight, like, rabbit

work the rabbit's foot on (someone)

obsolete To deceive, dupe, or trick someone. You may have worked the rabbit's foot on everyone else in the department to get where you are, but I know you're up to no good.
See also: foot, on, work

pants rabbits

dated Body or pubic lice. You gotta stop going round those brothels, Harry, or you'll end up with pants rabbits—or worse! I'm surprised y'all didn't come back with pants rabbits crawlin' all over ya after sleeping out in that dirty ol' barn all night!
See also: pant, rabbit

rabbit food

slang Any salad greens, usually lettuce. I don't know how you can eat a whole plate of rabbit food like that. I would need some meat and potatoes on my plate, at least! Care for any rabbit food? It's good for you!
See also: food, rabbit

rabbit punch

slang Any quick punch that does not have much power behind it. The nimble little boxer kept outmaneuvering his hulking opponent, wearing him down with barrage after barrage of rabbit punches throughout the match.
See also: punch, rabbit

fix

1. verb, euphemism To spay or neuter an animal so that they can no longer produce offspring. Hey, you need to fix your cat before she has another litter of kittens.
2. verb To influence the outcome of something, often through illicit means. Will I be expelled if they find out that I fixed the student council election?
3. noun A method of repairing something. Have you tried turning your phone off and on? That's always a good fix for whatever ails it.
4. noun A bribe. The authorities are trying to determine if the referees accepted a fix before that game.
5. noun, slang A dose of drugs, typically when given to an addict (especially one nearing or experiencing withdrawal symptoms). Oh man, thanks for the fix —I was really starting to feel bad there.

*fix

 
1. Sl. a dose of a drug or narcotic. (*Typically: get ~; have ~; give someone ~; need ~.) The addict badly needed a fix and was very fidgety.
2. an appropriate repair. Do you have a good fix for a leaky faucet?

fix something

Sl. to pay money in secret to have something turn out the way you want. The Boss fixed all the horse races in the county. After the gun-control bill failed to pass, there were rumors that the gun lobby had fixed the legislature.

pull something out of a hat

 and pull something out of thin air 
1. Lit. [for a magician] to make something, such as a live rabbit, seem to appear by pulling it out of a top hat or out of the air. He pulled a rabbit out of a hat and then pulled a chicken out of thin air.
2. Fig. to produce something seemingly out of nowhere. Where am I going to get the money? I can't just pull it out of a hat! I don't know where she found the book. She pulled it out of thin air, I guess.
See also: hat, of, out, pull

pull out of a hat

Produce suddenly and surprisingly, as if by magic. For example, We can't just pull the answers out of a hat. This expression alludes to the magician's trick of pulling some unexpected object out of a hat. That object is often a rabbit, and the expression pull a rabbit out of a hat is often used to mean "get magical results," as in Much as I would like to be able to pull a rabbit out of a hat, I doubt if I can find further funding for this project .
See also: hat, of, out, pull

like a rabbit caught in the headlights

or

like a deer caught in the headlights

If someone is like a rabbit caught in the headlights or like a deer caught in the headlights, they are so frightened or nervous that they do not know what to do. He just sat there, like a rabbit caught in the headlights. Diane fixes me with her cold, blue eyes: I am the proverbial deer caught in the headlights. Note: This expression is very variable. For example, you can just say that someone is caught or frozen in the headlights. He was caught in the headlights as he attempted to answer a string of questions about his relationship. The best thing for a writer caught in the headlights of unexpected celebrity is simply to keep writing and publishing. Note: Animals such as rabbits or deer sometimes remain still because they do not know which way to run when the light from a vehicle's headlights shines on them at night.

pull a rabbit out of the hat

JOURNALISM
COMMON If someone pulls a rabbit out of the hat, they unexpectedly do something which solves a problem or helps them to achieve something. I cannot pull a rabbit out of a hat every time I go into the boxing ring. All I can do is do my best. Note: This expression is often varied. It looks as though I will have to pull a few rabbits from the hat. Almost every politician with whom they had dealings appeared to act as if rabbits could pop out of any hat. Note: You can also say that someone pulls something good or successful out of the hat. The Chancellor failed to pull any economic miracles out of the hat last night. He might still be able to pull something out of his hat, but I'd be kind of surprised at this point. Note: This expression refers to a traditional magician's trick, in which a rabbit is produced mysteriously out of an apparently empty hat.
See also: hat, of, out, pull, rabbit

let the dog see the rabbit

let someone get on with work they are ready and waiting to do. informal
This phrase comes from greyhound racing, where the dogs chase a mechanical rabbit around a track.
See also: dog, let, rabbit, see

breed like rabbits

reproduce prolifically. informal
See also: breed, like, rabbit

buy the rabbit

fare badly; come off worse. informal
See also: buy, rabbit

pull (or bring) a rabbit out of the (or a) hat

used to describe an action that is fortuitous, and may involve sleight of hand or deception.
See also: hat, of, out, pull, rabbit

work the rabbit's foot on

cheat or trick. US
A rabbit's foot is traditionally carried as a good-luck charm.
See also: foot, on, work

pull something/a ˌrabbit out of the ˈhat

(informal) suddenly produce something as a solution to a problem: We had almost given up hope when Mick pulled a rabbit out of the hat by coming up with a great new idea.
This is a trick that is often done by magicians.
See also: hat, of, out, pull, rabbit, something

fix

1. and fix-up n. a dose of a drug, especially for an addict who is in need of drugs. (Drugs. It fixes the suffering of withdrawal.) It was clear that the prisoner needed a fix, but there was nothing the cops would do for him.
2. in. to buy a dose of drugs; to take drugs. (see also fixed. Drugs.) Frank had to fix before he could even talk to me.
3. tv. to castrate or spay an animal, especially a pet. (see also fixed. Jocularly of people.) Sally suggested that someone ought to fix Beavis—if he isn’t already.
4. n. a bribe. (see also fixed.) Rocko never took a fix in his life.
5. tv. to influence the outcome of a contest or an election. (see also fixed.) Sam knows what it takes to fix an election—cash.
6. n. a scheme to influence the outcome of a contest or an election. Something is wrong with this game. I smell a fix.
7. n. a repair made to a computer program. (Computers.) This little fix should make the whole program run faster.
8. n. a cure for a social ill. (see also quick fix.) There is no easy fix for a problem like this.

pants rabbits

n. lice. (see also seam-squirrels. Contrived.) Bart is sure scratching a lot. Do you think he’s got pants rabbits?
See also: pant, rabbit

rabbit food

n. lettuce; salad greens. Rabbit food tends to have a lot of vitamin C.
See also: food, rabbit

rabbit punch

n. a quick little punch. (Boxing and general slang.) She battered him with about forty rabbit punches on the arm. Boy, is he ever sore!
See also: punch, rabbit

pull a rabbit out of a hat, to

To come up with a surprise, usually a pleasant one. The term comes from the magician’s trick of pulling a live rabbit out of a seemingly empty hat. While the trick is old, the term was being transferred to other surprises only from the 1930s on. D. Sannon used it in Death by Inches (1965): “Well, you pulled the rabbit out of the hat.”
See also: of, out, pull, rabbit

rabbit food

Raw vegetables, especially lettuce. Dating from the first half of the 1900s, the term is sometimes used disparagingly by those who prefer more solid sustenance, but also positively by those who are dieting or find such food has great health benefits. For example, “What dessert? There’s nothing but rabbit food in her lunch box,” or “I’ve lost ten pounds by eating rabbit food at just about every meal.”
See also: food, rabbit