quote from (someone or something)

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quote from (someone or something)

To write or recite a quotation verbatim from some author or piece of writing. A noun or pronoun can be used between "quote" and "from" to specify what has been quoted. I'd love to quote a few lines from your poem during my speech, if that's all right. It took me a while to realize he was quoting from Shakespeare.
See also: quote

quote (something) from someone or something

to recite something verbatim that someone else has said; to recite something verbatim from a printed source. May I quote from your letter of the tenth? Do you mind if I quote a line from Keats?
See also: quote
References in periodicals archive ?
(I know because I had the task of recovering the cost if repair!) Happy and varied memories of working "Under the City Hall clock", to quote something from the long defunct Cardiff & Suburban News.
Stephen Kendall, principal clerk of the General Assembly, challenged the Presbyterians to quote something from the Heidelberg Catechism, a doctrinal standard for the CRC; and challenged Christian Reformed folks to quote something from the Westminster Confession.
Or will someone be able to quote something from the Bible that contradicts that?
To help understand the position they took, I'll quote something from the terms and conditions of your service agreement: 3.8 General Exclusions a.
As I typically like to quote something from the subject book, I have chosen the following: