quiet down

(redirected from quiet them down)

quiet down

1. To become calm, quiet, and relaxed; to stop being so noisy and boisterous. A small amount of television after dinner is actually a good way of helping kids quiet down before bed time. It takes the engine a minute to quiet down after you turn it off.
2. To cause, compel, or instruct someone or something to become less noisy and boisterous. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "quiet" and "down." A last-minute goal by the visiting team quieted the crowd down almost instantly. It can be a real chore unto itself trying to quiet the students down first thing in the morning.
See also: down, quiet

quiet (someone or an animal) down

to make someone or an animal more quiet. Please go and quiet the children down. Try to quiet down the children. Please quiet that dog down.
See also: down, quiet

quiet down

to become quiet; to become less noisy. Please quiet down. Ask them to quiet down.
See also: down, quiet

quiet down

v.
1. To become less noisy or more relaxed; calm down: When the class quiets down, we can proceed. Quiet down now.
2. To cause someone or something to become less noisy or more relaxed: Please quiet down those children or you will have to leave. We need to quiet the dogs down.
See also: down, quiet
References in periodicals archive ?
But the pressure from bankers is so intense they will probably move even a little just to quiet them down.
"Around 1.30am, I heard barking from the kennels near the house so I went out to investigate but I thought the dogs were just barking at cats and I managed to quiet them down."
"I believe that the behavior of the patient more than the pain itself often drives the doctor to give them opioids--if nothing else, to simply quiet them down," he said.
With peck and cawkle, he must quiet them down. Then there is a shifting and settling: one of the hens tries to remember the latest worm she caught, but the memory is already fading, on its way down her crop.
Ultimately, the idea behind FIRE was to bring people to prayer, to quiet them down in their busy lives, to surprise them by opening them up to an experience of God.
There are a lot of moral and ethical reasons against using chemical restraint since it reaffirms patients' greatest fear about medication--that the physician is going "to take them over and quiet them down." If physicians want patients to be partners in treatment, this is not the way to treat them, she said.