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quid pro quo

A favor done for someone in exchange for a favor in return. This Latin phrase means "something for something." You wash my car, and I'll drop off your dry cleaning—quid pro quo. Our company has a specific policy against quid pro quo, to prevent unfair treatment and harassment.
See also: pro, quid, quo

be quids in

slang To be able to profit or gain from something. ("Quid" is a slang term for the British pound.) Primarily heard in UK. We'll be quids in if that company buys our software!
See also: quid

quids in

slang Able to profit or gain from something. ("Quid" is a slang term for the British pound.) Primarily heard in UK. We'll be quids in if that company buys our software!
See also: quid

be not the full quid

slang To be a bit crazy or wacky. Primarily heard in Australia. He's not the full quid if he thinks that plan is going to work. Of course he's not the full quid—he's wearing pajamas at the beach!
See also: full, not, quid

for quids

For any compensation or incentive; under any conditions or in any situation. Often used in the negative. If there are bugs in your basement, then I'm not going down there for quids!
See also: quid

not the full quid

Rather stupid or unintelligent; slightly crazy or unhinged. Primarily heard in Australia, Canada. He's not the full quid if he thinks that plan is going to work. Of course he's not the full quid—he's wearing pajamas at the beach!
See also: full, not, quid

not the full shilling

Rather stupid or unintelligent; slightly crazy or unhinged. He's not the full shilling if he thinks that plan is going to work. Of course he's not the full shilling—he's wearing pajamas at the beach!
See also: full, not, shilling

quid pro quo

An equal exchange or substitution, as in I think it should be quid pro quo-you mow the lawn and I'll take you to the movies. This Latin expression, meaning "something for something," has been used in English since the late 1500s.
See also: pro, quid, quo

quids in

BRITISH, INFORMAL
If you are quids in, you make or have more money than you expected. Workers soon cheered up when they realised that being paid in euros had left them quids in. Note: `Quid' is an informal word for a pound sterling.
See also: quid

not the full shilling

BRITISH, INFORMAL
If you say that someone is not the full shilling, you mean that they are stupid or crazy. We all thought he wasn't quite the full shilling because he was slow — slow at sums and slow at writing.
See also: full, not, shilling

be quids in

be in a position where you have profited or are likely to profit from something. British informal
Quids is only found in this phrase, the normal plural being quid .
See also: quid

not the full quid

not very intelligent. Australian & New Zealand informal
As an informal term for a pound sterling (or, in former times, a sovereign or guinea) quid dates from the late 17th century: its origins are unknown. Compare with not the full shilling (at shilling).
See also: full, not, quid

not the full shilling

not mentally alert or quick-thinking.
See also: full, not, shilling

not the full ˈquid

(AustralE, New Zealand, informal) not very intelligent: George always looks to me like he’s not the full quid. OPPOSITE: all there
A quid is an informal word for one pound in British money.
See also: full, not, quid

ˌquid pro ˈquo

(from Latin) a thing that is given in return for something else: The management have agreed to begin pay talks as a quid pro quo for suspension of strike action.
The meaning of the Latin phrase is ‘something for something’.
See also: pro, quid, quo

quids ˈin

(British English, informal) in a position of having made a profit, especially a good profit: I’ve just received three cheques so we’re quids in at the moment.
A quid is an informal word for one pound in money.
See also: quid

quid pro quo

Tit for tat; in law, a consideration (payment). These Latin words, literally meaning “this for that,” have been used in this way since Shakespeare’s time. Indeed, he used it in Henry VI, Part 1, when Margaret tells the Earl of Suffolk, “I cry you mercy, ’tis but quid pro quo” (5.3).
See also: pro, quid, quo
References in periodicals archive ?
<B Car Quids pay car owners to advertise companies
Once a site is acquired, a decision will be made if it is suitable for a Quids Inn or a Tavistock restaurant bar." Mr Foster previously pulled back from leisure outlets to concentrate on his engineering interests.
For more information on Quids for Kids or to find out if your child's school has registered yet, email quidsforkids@pmwcom.co.uk or contact Sarah Purnell on 01403 783400.
It is hoped that Quids Inns will replicate the success of Mr Foster's Roker Hotel at Sunderland.
The proceeds will be used to fund the expansion of Quids Inns.
Quids in: A four-night DFDS Seaways City CruiseBreak costs pounds 157 before the end of March; call 08705-333111 or see www.dfdsseaways.co.uk.
Quids in: A week starting 15 May costs pounds 29.80 a person or pounds 149 in total for a family of two adults and three kids (includes ferry crossings), through Eurosite; call 0870-608 1913.
Quids in: Seven nights' half-board in a four-star hotel with flights from Gatwick cost pounds 145, travelling on 24 January, through www.cheapflights.co.uk.
Quids in: Two weeks in Duinrell on 10 May for two adults and three kids costs about pounds 168 each, (including ferry).
Quids in: A four-night break for two in a self-catering studio is about pounds 179 a person, including car ferry, through Perfect Places; call 0870- 366 7562.
Michelle, daughter of Scottish former world boxing champion Jim Watt, said: 'The Quids for Kids initiative is an absolutely fantastic way for us to help spread a little extra cheer this year.'
The Quids In cards are produced by Lucky Lotteries and have a top prize of pounds 1000.
Owned by US company Cash America, Quick Quid's run by Daniel Feehan, who won't need a loan himself - he netted around pounds 700,000 in salary and bonuses according to US business bible Forbes.
They might not fetch the same five-figure sum at auction, but like most football memorabilia (or tat you threw out long ago) they'll be worth a few quid at some point.
And so,with the club set to pocket a few quid thanks to the live coverage of next month's CIS Cup quarter-final against Aberdeen,I politely ask the club's owner to consider slashing the prices at the gate.