quid pro quo

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quid pro quo

A favor done for someone in exchange for a favor in return. This Latin phrase means "something for something." You wash my car, and I'll drop off your dry cleaning—quid pro quo. Our company has a specific policy against quid pro quo, to prevent unfair treatment and harassment.
See also: pro, quid, quo

quid pro quo

An equal exchange or substitution, as in I think it should be quid pro quo-you mow the lawn and I'll take you to the movies. This Latin expression, meaning "something for something," has been used in English since the late 1500s.
See also: pro, quid, quo

ˌquid pro ˈquo

(from Latin) a thing that is given in return for something else: The management have agreed to begin pay talks as a quid pro quo for suspension of strike action.
The meaning of the Latin phrase is ‘something for something’.
See also: pro, quid, quo

quid pro quo

Tit for tat; in law, a consideration (payment). These Latin words, literally meaning “this for that,” have been used in this way since Shakespeare’s time. Indeed, he used it in Henry VI, Part 1, when Margaret tells the Earl of Suffolk, “I cry you mercy, ’tis but quid pro quo” (5.3).
See also: pro, quid, quo
References in periodicals archive ?
He would provide an additional public service by reporting on Bush's involvement in the quid pro quo policy and evaluating Bush's incredible claim that he alone among top Reagan officials knew practically nothing of the Iran initiative until it became public.
On the day the jury returned its verdict, Bush, in full Nixonian mode, declared, "The word of the President of the United States, George Bush, is there was no quid pro quo," referring to a March 1985 meeting he had with President Roberto Suazo Cordova of Honduras.
The existence of a Honduran quid pro quo -and there really is no other way to interpret the documents -has earned the most notice.
No self-respecting political fundraiser talks openly about explicit or implicit quid pro quos. But Frederick Bush (no relation to George), who co-chaired two of the campaign's major fund-raising programs, was a bit more candid.