quid


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quid pro quo

A favor done for someone in exchange for a favor in return. This Latin phrase means "something for something." You wash my car, and I'll drop off your dry cleaning—quid pro quo. Our company has a specific policy against quid pro quo, to prevent unfair treatment and harassment.
See also: pro, quid, quo

be quids in

slang To be able to profit or gain from something. ("Quid" is a slang term for the British pound.) Primarily heard in UK. We'll be quids in if that company buys our software!
See also: quid

quids in

slang Able to profit or gain from something. ("Quid" is a slang term for the British pound.) Primarily heard in UK. We'll be quids in if that company buys our software!
See also: quid

be not the full quid

slang To be a bit crazy or wacky. Primarily heard in Australia. He's not the full quid if he thinks that plan is going to work. Of course he's not the full quid—he's wearing pajamas at the beach!
See also: full, not, quid

for quids

For any compensation or incentive; under any conditions or in any situation. Often used in the negative. If there are bugs in your basement, then I'm not going down there for quids!
See also: quid

not the full quid

Rather stupid or unintelligent; slightly crazy or unhinged. Primarily heard in Australia, Canada. He's not the full quid if he thinks that plan is going to work. Of course he's not the full quid—he's wearing pajamas at the beach!
See also: full, not, quid

not the full shilling

Rather stupid or unintelligent; slightly crazy or unhinged. He's not the full shilling if he thinks that plan is going to work. Of course he's not the full shilling—he's wearing pajamas at the beach!
See also: full, not, shilling

quid pro quo

An equal exchange or substitution, as in I think it should be quid pro quo-you mow the lawn and I'll take you to the movies. This Latin expression, meaning "something for something," has been used in English since the late 1500s.
See also: pro, quid, quo

quids in

BRITISH, INFORMAL
If you are quids in, you make or have more money than you expected. Workers soon cheered up when they realised that being paid in euros had left them quids in. Note: `Quid' is an informal word for a pound sterling.
See also: quid

not the full shilling

BRITISH, INFORMAL
If you say that someone is not the full shilling, you mean that they are stupid or crazy. We all thought he wasn't quite the full shilling because he was slow — slow at sums and slow at writing.
See also: full, not, shilling

be quids in

be in a position where you have profited or are likely to profit from something. British informal
Quids is only found in this phrase, the normal plural being quid .
See also: quid

not the full quid

not very intelligent. Australian & New Zealand informal
As an informal term for a pound sterling (or, in former times, a sovereign or guinea) quid dates from the late 17th century: its origins are unknown. Compare with not the full shilling (at shilling).
See also: full, not, quid

not the full shilling

not mentally alert or quick-thinking.
See also: full, not, shilling

not the full ˈquid

(AustralE, New Zealand, informal) not very intelligent: George always looks to me like he’s not the full quid. OPPOSITE: all there
A quid is an informal word for one pound in British money.
See also: full, not, quid

ˌquid pro ˈquo

(from Latin) a thing that is given in return for something else: The management have agreed to begin pay talks as a quid pro quo for suspension of strike action.
The meaning of the Latin phrase is ‘something for something’.
See also: pro, quid, quo

quids ˈin

(British English, informal) in a position of having made a profit, especially a good profit: I’ve just received three cheques so we’re quids in at the moment.
A quid is an informal word for one pound in money.
See also: quid

quid pro quo

Tit for tat; in law, a consideration (payment). These Latin words, literally meaning “this for that,” have been used in this way since Shakespeare’s time. Indeed, he used it in Henry VI, Part 1, when Margaret tells the Earl of Suffolk, “I cry you mercy, ’tis but quid pro quo” (5.3).
See also: pro, quid, quo
References in periodicals archive ?
The keywords (or subject terms) extracted from the 788 articles included the following: squamous cell carcinoma, OC, betel quid, areca nut, expression, tobacco, oral submucous fibrosis, cigarette smoking, arecoline, carcinogenesis, alcohol, India, p53, leukoplakia, lesions, epithelial cell, and esophageal cancer, which had significant correlations with emphasis on such vital keywords as squamous cell carcinoma, OC, betel quid, areca nut, and expression [Figure 3].
Therefore it is necessary that measures should be taken to make the common people conscious of the perilous outcome of areca nut and betel quid use.
Both keeping and not keeping, the quid in the mouth overnight increased the effect of chewing further among both male and female chewers.
A Bangladeshi cohort study, conducted over 10 years, has reported a greater risk of all-cause mortality and cancer related morality in betel quid chewers.
Uno de los asuntos recurrentes en los articulos publicados en Quid Novi?
"We are proud to have reached this funding milestone with Quid, right on the heels of signing our first multi-million-dollar customers," said Neville Crawley, CEO of Quid.
Betel quid is freshly prepared by the user or a vendor.
Maybe if the Brazilian organisers hold out for the Baron Coe rule of charging a quid every time someone utters the word legacy they might come a few quid less down than the South Africans.
"All pensioners have to do is ask the driver for the kids for a quid ticket and the family can spend a full day making the most of the school holidays."
Strong association with tobacco smoking and chewing, betel quid and its substitutes was detected, with smoking being more prevalent in males and betel quid in females.
Betel quid ([TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]) is first chewed by new immigrants to Taiwan to cure jungle fever, and becomes a habitual practice of Taiwanese, especially middle-aged men with lower education background, meager salary(NTD20,000~40,000) and aborigines.
For more than 18 months, I have been monitoring Quid, Inc., a San Francisco-based analytics and intelligence startup.
Players were paid around ten quid a week, as opposed to the seven quid paid to a skilled engineering worker like myself.
Yesterday it was worth 44p shy of fifty quid. Now that buys a lot.
"I was naive and said to Seymour: 'What's in it for me?' "Quick as a flash Stan replied: 'Oh, we don't do anything like that.' A short while later Jimmy Scoular signed and got a right few quid.