queer

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queer

1. verb To ruin or upset something. You're going to queer the whole thing if you keep asking so many questions!
2. noun A derogatory and highly offensive term for a homosexual, bisexual, transgender, or otherwise non-heterosexual or non-cisgender person.
3. noun A reclaimed term (see Definition 2) used by homosexual, bisexual, transgender, or otherwise non-heterosexual or non-cisgender people to self-identify as such. Yeah, I'm a queer, a dude who likes dudes. So what?
4. noun, slang Alcohol, especially when it is not allowed (such as during Prohibition). You better not get caught drinking that queer in here.
5. adjective Very strange. Everyone could tell he was a queer one as soon as he walked into the party with his mismatched clothing.
6. adjective A derogatory and highly offensive term used to describe a homosexual, bisexual, transgender, or otherwise non-heterosexual or non-cisgender person.
7. adjective A reclaimed term (see Definition 6) used by homosexual, bisexual, transgender, or otherwise non-heterosexual or non-cisgender people to self-identify as such or to describe related issues, interests, etc. Being queer shouldn't mean having to be treated as a second-class citizen. Queer literature is having a renaissance.
8. adjective Describing a sensibility or perspective that rejects the notion that there are only two distinct gender identities. That haircut really suits her queer aesthetic.
9. adjective Having a focus on sex and gender, especially that which is non-heteronormative. Couldn't we also do a queer reading of this text?
10. adjective Fraudulent or illegitimate. Don't show me those queer financial records—I don't want to know anything about your seedy doings!
11. adjective, slang Drunk. Do you remember last night at the bar at all? You were really queer.

queered

slang Made or turned into a non-heterosexual. Often but not always used in an offensive derogatory manner. He said he didn't want to join the wrestling team because he was afraid of getting queered by having so much physical contact with other guys. That was so amazing. If I weren't already gay, I think I would have gotten queered by watching it.
See also: queer

queer

1. mod. counterfeit. I don’t want any queer money.
2. n. illicit liquor, especially whiskey. (Prohibition era.) This isn’t queer; it’s left over from before prohibition.
3. mod. alcohol intoxicated.  After a glass or two, he got a little queer.
4. tv. to spoil something. Please don’t queer the deal.
5. mod. homosexual. (Rude and derogatory. But now in wider use in a positive sense.) She doesn’t like being called queer.
6. n. a homosexual male, occasionally a female. (Rude and derogatory. But now in wider use in a positive sense.) Tell that queer to stop following me.

queered

mod. alcohol intoxicated. (In the sense made bogus.) How can anybody get so queered on two beers?
See also: queer
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References in periodicals archive ?
I want to be careful here, the queerer reading is not about reducing the poem to a locus of pleasure between men, as say a theorist like Guss would do--though undoubtedly this reading functions, and functions perfectly well, especially since Agustini avoids gendering the one who is intruded upon.
This essay will argue that a queerer framing of Helga Crane's longings of her desire to desire and her desire to belong have the potential to produce new ways of thinking the foundational themes of kinship and desire in Quicksand.
Holdane's comment: "My own suspicion is that the universe is not only queerer than we suppose, but queerer than we can suppose.
alternative, queerer, more fantasmatic approaches to history--some of which, in this chapter, I call literary--need to be developed" (31).
The film also omits dialogue and stage business that call attention to aspects of the characters' queerer tendencies or that assume some understanding of more subtle nuances of gay culture.
although surely my Hemingway is gayer and queerer than most Hemingways" (4).
Haldane once admitted to suspecting that "the Universe is not only queerer than we suppose, but queerer than we can suppose.
Assimilating another 'virtually normal' constituency, namely monogamous, long-term, homosexual couples, marriage pushes the queerer queers of all sexual persuasions--drag queens, club-crawlers, polyamorists, even ordinary single mothers or teenage lovers--further to the margins.
Furthermore, the writer's energetic attempt to transform Chaucer's queerer figures towards either heterosexuality in disguise (the Pardoner) or a kind of wholesale debauchery that is dutifully punished (the Summoner) betrays a stark homophobia at work.
Assimilating another "virtually normal" constituency, namely monogamous, long-term, homosexual couples, marriage pushes the queerer queers of all sexual persuasions--drag queens, club-crawlers, polyamorists, even ordinary single mothers or teenage lovers--further to the margins.
Any effort to erase these origins in favor of a sexier, younger, and queerer spouse will surely be met with swift vengeance from an anthropological 'First Wives Club'" (124).
Perhaps Einstein was right when he said, "The universe is not only queerer than we suppose.
And yet even here one continues to see at work a paradigm of imagining the South to be, if not the exclusive site of American queerness, at least queerer than the rest of the nation.
In the world of transgender theory, identity politics is alive and well, although queerer than it used to be.