put onto (someone or something)

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put onto (someone or something)

1. Literally, to place someone or something on top of something. You can put the vase onto the mantelpiece. He put the child onto the table and gave her an ice cream cone.
2. To put someone in contact with someone else; to make someone aware of someone or something. Got into a car accident, huh? Don't worry, I'll put you onto a great mechanic. She put me onto a tech company that's looking to hire new engineers.
See also: put
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

put someone onto someone or something

to alert someone to the existence of someone or something; to lead someone to someone or something. Nancy put Elaine onto George, who knew of a job that Elaine might be interested in. Nancy put Elaine onto a good job lead.
See also: put
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
See also:
References in periodicals archive ?
Divide and roll the cake mixture into 18 evenly-sized balls, putting them onto a baking sheet.
A Jambox app grabs music playlists from iTunes, Spotify and Rdio, for example, putting them onto one interface for easy access.
Taking them out of the box and putting them onto a tree?
She added: "Obviously it helps our percentage rate at GCSE, but that wasn't the reason for putting them onto vocational courses.
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The children engaged in "reflection" at the end of each day's participation in the project, drawing or writing about what they had thought about during the day, synthesizing their thoughts and putting them onto paper.
He said: "Immigration police are putting them onto the first plane back to the country they are fleeing from.
"Our best guess is that it would probably take them (Pakistan) a year or two to...weaponize their nuclear weapons by putting them onto warheads," Kenneth Bacon told a news briefing.
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