put the lie to (something)

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put the lie to (something)

To refute or counter something; to show something to be incorrect or false. Her dejected demeanor put the lie to her statement that she was doing great. I have evidence putting lie to the president's claims that he never violated the tax code as a private citizen.
See also: lie, put, to
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

put the lie to

To show to be false or inaccurate.
See also: lie, put, to
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
But, that is not the case, putting the lie to this line of reasoning.
And American politics, like New England weather, has a habit of confounding the experts and putting the lie to predictions.
Backing the armed struggle of the Libyan people came less than a month since President Barak Obama on February 11 hailed the Egyptians' "shouting 'Silmiya, Silmiya'" - thus adding the Arabic word to the international language lexicon - because the "Egyptians have inspired us, and they've done so by putting the lie to the idea that justice is best gained by violence ..
administration was in full gear backing the Libyan armed violent revolt, which has turned into a full scale civil war, despite being the same world power who officially label the legitimate (according to the charter of the United Nations) armed defense of the Palestinian people against the 34- year old foreign military occupation of Israel as "terrorism." Backing the armed struggle of the Libyan people came less than a month since President Barak Obama on February 11 hailed the Egyptians' "shouting 'Silmiya, Silmiya'" -- thus adding the Arabic word to the international language lexicon -- because the "Egyptians have inspired us, and they've done so by putting the lie to the idea that justice is best gained by violence ..
Mr Obama added: "Egyptians have inspired us, and they've done so by putting the lie to the idea that justice is best gained by violence.
Mr Obama said: "Egyptians have inspired us, and they've done so by putting the lie to the idea that justice is best gained by violence.
One is as likely to find a straight iambic pentameter--"To enter rot and raise no arm and shout!"--in one of his looser poems as in these set forms (one of the Byronic eighteeners is actually a footnote to another one, putting the lie to any notion of "closed" form).
With labor statistics putting the lie to that, Obama has now begun to talk of "jobs saved"--in some cases in places that don't exist.
This is just the latest case of an Israeli government's actions putting the lie to its words.
In 1978, he won his third world championship title, putting the lie to the old boxing adage "they never come back".
Guttenplan, whose own unpublished biography of Izzy is much anticipated, with putting the lie to the allegations of those who tried, a few years ago, to argue that he was some sort of Soviet agent.
We may be reminded by these pairs that Jesus has promised to be present wherever two or three are gathered together in his name (Mt 18:20), putting the lie to individualized or competitive endeavors done in the name of the Holy One.
Lie #4--It Will Be Easy: Iraq as a "Cakewalk." "The capture of Saddam Hussein does not mean the end of violence in Iraq," Bush admitted, putting the lie to the idiotic and arrogant statements by Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld and others that policing Iraq would be a simple matter that could be quickly delegated to Iraqis as soon as they stopped celebrating the US military's arrival and cleaned up all those flowers they were going to throw.
The only reports of looting came from Ottawa, putting the lie to the stereotype that Americans are less well-behaved than their neighbors to the north.
Just before the conference, President Bush, in the company of foreign-policy savant Bono of the rock group U2, announced during a speech to the Inter-American Development Bank a steep increase in American foreign aid, to the tune of five billion taxpayer dollars over the next three years - effectively putting the lie to any lingering claims of his fiscal conservatism.