put the/(one's) clock(s) back

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put the/(one's) clock(s) back

To adjust the time on one's clock(s) back by one hour to account for the end of daylight saving time. Don't forget to put your clock back tonight. I hate having to put the clocks back every autumn, it's such an antiquated custom.
See also: back, put

put/turn the ˈclock back

return to the past; return to old-fashioned ideas, customs, etc: Sometimes I wish I could turn the clock back to my days as a student.These new restrictions on medical research will undoubtedly put the clock back (by) 20 years.
See also: back, clock, put, turn
References in periodicals archive ?
Some people just think there's no point putting the clocks back an hour because in a few months you have to move them forward again.
If we resisted putting the clocks back on Sunday and instead carried on, putting them forward next spring and back again the following autumn, we'd shift an hour of daylight from the morning to the evening (called Single/ Double Summertime - SDST).
The controversy over putting the clocks back is a subject now being researched by Laura Neale, a 25-year-old PhD student with Northumbria University, who is looking into the impact of time changes on sleep and wellbeing at work.
P Green, Lurgan Co Armagh INSTEAD of putting the clocks back this weekend, could we not keep the hours as they are and adapt to it?
It also includes a wide range of topical editorial articles covering everything from preventing the spread of colds and flu during the winter months through to the impact that putting the clocks back has on workplaces.
Not putting the clocks back on Sunday morning but still putting them forward in the spring would increase daylight hours and encourage more outdoor activity, a report in the British Medical Journal suggests.
In return, putting the clocks back in the autumn reduces the risk, albeit to a lesser extent, according to scientists at Karolinska Institutet after they examined how the incidence of myocardial infarction in Sweden has changed with summer and winter clock-shifts since 1987.
Putting the clocks back is the benchmark for sorting out roses.
But it has been proved that children would be much safer if they were going home in daylight at the end of their day Why then, are we still putting the clocks back whenwe could be saving lives?
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