put up with


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put (someone) up with (one)

To have one provide someone with overnight accommodation, especially temporarily. Beth's going to the hospital for her surgery. Could we put Tommy up with you for a couple days while she's away?
See also: put, up

put up with (someone or something)

To abide or endure someone or something that one finds unpleasant, inconvenient, or annoying. I don't know how you put up with John—he's such a loudmouth! I really like my job, for the most part, but I do have to put up with a lot of tedious busywork.
See also: put, up
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

put someone up with someone

to house someone with someone. I will put her up with my cousin, who has an extra bedroom. We will put up the lady with us.
See also: put, up

put up with someone or something

to tolerate or endure someone or something; to be able to stand someone or something. I cannot put up with your constant whining any longer! We can put up with John's living here until he finds a place of his own.
See also: put, up
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

put up with

Endure without complaint, as in She's been very patient, putting up with all kinds of inconvenience. [Mid-1700s]
See also: put, up
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

put up with

To endure without complaint: We had to put up with the inconvenience.
See also: put, up
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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