put (one) to work

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put (one) to work

To give one a particular task to do. We're here to help, so just put us to work wherever you need us. Whenever I come home for a visit, my mom wastes no time putting me to work—last time, I had to vacuum the whole house!
See also: put, work

put/set somebody to ˈwork (on something)

make somebody start work (doing something): On his first day in the office they put him to work on some typing.
See also: put, set, somebody, work
References in periodicals archive ?
THE TECHNOLOGY IS SO adaptable it can be put to work in the front office, the back office, the factory and the warehouse.
The oldest son, Bud, has chosen to be a pacifist to the extent that he will have no part in the war effort, and he is put to work in a mental hospital where he gets no real salary for doing excruciatingly difficult work.
Collins says many scientific hurdles remain before such transgenic mosquitoes could be put to work against malaria.
So survey your assets to see if there is anything that might be liquidated and put to work through other investments.
If, as it is moderately popular to suppose, the United States has passed its zenith and entered a long period of decline, anthropologists of the next century will look back in amazement at an arrangement whereby the most ambitious and brightest members of each generation were siphoned off the productive work force, trained to think like a lawyer, and put to work chasing one another around in circles; where, as things got worse and worse, social reformers, cured by the Republicans of the habit of trying to solve all problems by throwing money at them, took to throwing lawyers at them instead; and where the portion of the population that went through a typical year happily oblivious of the legal profession slipped from two-thirds to one-half, to a quarter, to none at all.
Polyaspartic acid has also been put to work in controlling corrosion (SN: 5/4/91, p.
Scientists studying those fanciful allcarbon molecules called fullerenes have started off the new year with still more twists in how these molecules might be put to work in new materials.