put teeth in(to) (something)

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put teeth in(to) (something)

To make something stronger or more effective, especially a rule or piece of legislation. Senators are hoping to put teeth into the healthcare bill by attaching the threat of huge fines to insurance companies that don't comply. You'll never put teeth in the regulations if officers are not allowed to make arrests.
See also: put, teeth

put some teeth into something

Fig. to increase the power or efficacy of something. The mayor tried to put some teeth into the new law. The delivery clause in the contract is too weak. Put some teeth into it.
See also: put, teeth
References in periodicals archive ?
The pay discrimination that USWNT is subject to also reinforces the need to pass H.R.7, the Paycheck Fairness Act, into law to finally put teeth into the Equal Pay Act of 1963.
The ordinances were meant to put teeth into the rules crafted by the task force.
The new government will need to put teeth into this anti-corruption push, by holding some of the bribe-takers accountable.
PCCI chairman George Barcelon said the new law would put teeth into Duterte's pronouncement of reducing bureaucracy and corruption.
"We need to put teeth into the deployment ban," he stated.
Also: Agency To Put Teeth Into Rules Governing Unsanctioned Stem Cell Therapies
The $150 fine is crucial to detering people from dressing up as clowns, officials said. "In order for it to be effective you have to put teeth into it," Kemper County Board attorney Bo Bailey said.
"They put teeth into it," Collier said of Congress.
Thus, to put teeth into the law, parties found in violation of the statute shall be meted a penalty of a fine of not less than P50,000 (Dh3,932) but not more than P100,000 (Dh7,863), or by imprisonment of one year but not more than two years, or both, at the discretion of the court."
"What we have to do is put in a framework and put teeth into it."
"ACA salutes Federal Communications Commission Chairman Tom Wheeler for leading the effort to put teeth into the regulations that require broadcasters to negotiate retransmission consent with cable and satellite TV providers in good faith.
This new act was needed to not only address domestic wildlife issues, but to put teeth into CITES and fulfill the nation's promise to regulate domestic and international movement of endangered species and their parts.
According to Neal, “The new regulations put teeth into the ADAAA's goal of making it easier to meet one of the three tests for 'disability' needed for coverage under the Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA).” Neal's article was published on December 19, 2011, in Texas Lawyer.
"We must put teeth into the policy we passed last year," said Kenny, adding that steps to help Palestinians should go beyond simply making speeches and agreeing conference resolutions.
To put teeth into the system, Keynes proposed that any deficit country--a country tapping more than one-quarter of its maximum overdraft allowance--would be charged interest.