in the doldrums

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in the doldrums

1. Depressed or in low spirits; lethargic, sluggish, or lacking energy. I've been in the doldrums ever since my grandfather died last month. I haven't really felt like going out and seeing friends lately. I'm just down in the doldrums a bit, I suppose.
2. In a state of stagnation; lacking activity or progress. After being in the doldrums for the past several years, the economy finally began to pick up over the last two months. The company has been in the doldrums ever since they replaced their CEO.
See also: doldrums
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

*in the doldrums

Fig. sluggish; inactive; in low spirits. (*Typically: be ~; put someone [into] ~.) He's usually in the doldrums in the winter. I had some bad news yesterday, which put me into the doldrums.
See also: doldrums
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

in the doldrums

Depressed; dull and listless. For example, Dean's in the doldrums for most of every winter. This expression alludes to the maritime doldrums, a belt of calms and light winds north of the equator in which sailing ships were often becalmed. [Early 1800s] Also see down in the dumps.
See also: doldrums
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

in the doldrums

COMMON If a person, organization, economy, etc. is in the doldrums, they are not successful and are not making any progress. The restaurant business, like many other businesses, is in the doldrums. I was bored and my career was in the doldrums.
See also: doldrums
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

in the ˈdoldrums

quiet or depressed: Property sales have been in the doldrums for some time.He was in the doldrums for the whole winter.
See also: doldrums
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

in the doldrums

Depressed, down in the dumps; stagnant, inactive. The word, whose origin is uncertain, began to be used in the early nineteenth century both for the maritime doldrums, a belt of calms and light winds north of the equator in which sailing ships often found themselves becalmed, and for a feeling of depression. Thus Frederick Marryat wrote, in Jacob Faithful (1835), “Come father, old Dictionary is in the doldrums; rouse him up.”
See also: doldrums
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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