put one's oar in, to

put one's oar in

 and stick one's oar in; put one's two cents(' worth) in
Fig. to add one's comments or opinion, even if unwanted or unasked for. You don't need to put your oar in. I don't need your advice. I'm sorry. I shouldn't have stuck my oar in when you were arguing with your wife. Do you mind if I put in my oar? I have a suggestion. There is no need for you to put in your two cents' worth.
See also: oar, put

put one's oar in

Interfere with something or insert one's opinion, as in I'll thank you not to put your oar in when we're discussing a private matter. This term, referring to helping to row a boat, was first recorded in Charles Coffey's 1731 play The Devil to Pay: "I will govern my own house without your putting in an oar."
See also: oar, put

put one's oar in, to

To insert one’s opinion; to interfere in someone else’s business. This term, with its analogy to contributing one’s efforts to rowing a boat, dates from the late sixteenth century. Charles Coffey used it in his play The Devil to Pay (1731): “I will govern my own house without your putting in an oar” (1:2).
See also: oar, put
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