put one's money where one's mouth is

put (one's) money where (one's) mouth is

To do, live up to, or follow through on something one talks about, threatens, or promises, especially (but not always) when it involves spending money. Fans who have been demanding a sequel for the last decade had better put their money where their mouth is and go buy a ticket! He promised to lower taxes if he got elected. Now let's see if he'll put his money where his mouth is.
See also: money, mouth, put
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

put one's money where one's mouth is

Back up one's opinion with action, as in He goes on and on about helping the homeless; I wish he'd put his money where his mouth is . This idiom, alluding to contributing cash to support one's stated views, has been broadened to include any kind of action. [First half of 1900s]
See also: money, mouth, put
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

put one's money where one's mouth is, to

Back up your stated position with action. This term, according to Eric Partridge’s informants, was current in the United States from at least 1930 and caught on in Britain and other English-speaking countries shortly after World War II. In 1975 the British government used it as an advertising slogan to persuade people to invest their savings in the National Savings Bank Accounts Department. See also put up or shut up.
See also: money, mouth, put
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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