put one's best foot forward

put (one's) best foot forward

To try to act as an ideal version of oneself, typically to try to impress others. You really need to put your best foot forward in the interview if you want to get this job.
See also: foot, forward, put

put one's best foot forward

Try for the best possible impression, make a good start, as in Come on, let's put our best foot forward for this interview. The allusion in this idiom is unclear, though it may concern marching. One theory is that best foot means "the right foot," the left being regarded as unlucky. [Late 1500s]
See also: foot, forward, put

put one's best foot forward, to

To try to make the best possible impression. There is something inherently puzzling about this expression, which dates from the sixteenth century. What exactly is one’s “best foot,” and why should it signify putting on a good show? Shakespeare made it the better foot (in Titus Andronicus and King John), and Sir Thomas Overby wrote, in 1613 (Characters: A footeman), “His legs are not matches, for he is still setting the best foot forward.” One writer suggests that “best foot” always meant “right foot,” the left being considered unlucky. Whatever the explanation, the metaphor is still current.
See also: foot, put
References in periodicals archive ?
Ambition, keenness and the ability to put one's best foot forward even on an off day are a given.
Being part of an organization that sparks positive emotions among customers via holistic experiences makes any employee proud and offers motivation to put one's best foot forward. Philanthropy works similarly, as great experiences can lead to better narratives about why an organization is special, which can lead to an easier time securing dollars from donors.
With her being such a great actress, one can't help but put one's best foot forward. There was one scene where she came in playing a bit player, and she delivered it perfectly.