put into words


Also found in: Legal.

put (something) into words

To express a thought or idea through written or especially spoken words. I find that I can put my ideas into words much better when I write them down, rather than trying to explain them to someone out loud. He struggled to put his feelings for Jane into words.
See also: put, word

put into words

Express verbally, as in I find it hard to put my feelings into words. [Late 1800s]
See also: put, word
References in classic literature ?
Notwithstanding this very plausible explanation, Hamel was conscious of the remains of an uneasiness which he scarcely knew how to put into words.
"They would not be a girl's feelings any longer if they could be put into words," replied the mountain nymph, laughing, but avoiding his eye.
John said: "It's quite difficult to put into words why I love the Black Country.
Rice added: "The result is difficult to put into words. The players have done the job.
It's hard to put into words what today means to me...
In the testimony she gave against Nassar earlier this year, the Olympic gold medallist said realising you're a survivor of sexual abuse is 'really hard to put into words'.
I really cannot put into words what has happened here''.
This little boy had put into words exactly what all those people were thinking.
"To hear the songs now and how they have absolutely transformed gives me a feeling that I just cannot put into words".
I have seen caring in my life, through the work I was involved in, yet what I witnessed in this hospital, is going to be very difficult to put into words.
He said: "I can't put into words what it means to me.
"It's not easy to put into words what I felt," he said.
A one-move rule for overtaking has finally been put into words.
He said hardly anything and kept using the line: "It's hard to put into words."
The devastated woman said: "I cannot put into words how devastated I am.