put (someone) in (one's) black book(s)

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put (someone) in (one's) black book(s)

To consider someone out of one's favor or good graces. I don't think I'll come to the party on Saturday. Jenny has kind of put me in her black book at the moment after our fight. Trust me, the last thing you want is for the government to put your business in their black books.
See also: black, put
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

black book, (put) in one's

Out of favor, disgraced. The term comes from actual listings of those to be censured or punished by the authorities, which date from the fifteenth century. The agents of Henry VIII, for example, compiled a black book of English monasteries listed as “sinful.” An eighteenth-century history of Oxford University also describes a proctor’s black book which, if one was listed in it, proscribed proceeding to a university degree. Today, however, one’s little black book may signify a personal address book, listing the telephone numbers of friends, especially those of the opposite sex.
See also: black
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer