put (one) off (one's) stride

put (one) off (one's) stride

To disturb, distract from, or interfere with what one is doing, such that they are unable to do it well. It really put me off my stride to have my parents watching while I worked on my painting. The boxer tried to put his opponent off his stride by getting in his face right before the fight.
See also: off, put, stride

put one off one's stride

Also, put one off one's stroke. Interfere with one's progress, distract or disturb one, as in The interruption put her off her stride for a moment, and she took several seconds to resume her train of thought , or The noise of the airplanes overhead put her off her stroke, and she missed the next ball . The first term, first recorded in 1946, alludes to the regular pace of a walker or runner; the variant, first recorded in 1914, alludes to the regular strokes of a rower. Also see throw off the track.
See also: off, one, put, stride

put someone off their stride

BRITISH
If something puts you off your stride, it stops you from concentrating on what you are doing, so that you do not do it as well as usual. It was clearly a tactic designed to put his opponent off his stride. Note: The verbs knock and throw are sometimes used instead of put. Perhaps a few jokes during the game will knock Chris off his stride. Compare with put someone off their stroke.
See also: off, put, someone, stride

put somebody off their ˈstride/ˈstroke

make somebody take their attention off what they are doing and stop doing it so well: All sorts of things can put a player off his stroke.
See also: off, put, somebody, stride, stroke
References in classic literature ?
Haughty English, lively French, sober Germans, handsome Spaniards, ugly Russians, meek Jews, free-and-easy Americans, all drive, sit, or saunter here, chatting over the news, and criticzing the latest celebrity who has arrived--Ristori or Dickens, Victor Emmanuel or the Queen of the Sandwich Islands.
I remember Antonia's excitement when she came into our kitchen one afternoon and announced: `My papa find friends up north, with Russian mans.
As the names of the Poles and Russians are to us, so are ours to them.
However, these people are not impolite to Russians or Germans.
This, at least, is the belief of the Japanese, who handled their armies by telephone when they drove back the Russians.
Though the artillery of the left wing of the Russians kept up a steady fire on this mass,--visible like a stain now black, now flaming, in the midst of the trackless snow,--this shot and shell seemed to the torpid creatures only one inconvenience the more.
Russians, Austrians, Britons, have millions on which we have an eye.
It had been ten years since the Russian had escaped the fate of his friend, the arch-fiend Rokoff, and not once, but many times during those ten years had Paulvitch cursed the fate that had given to Nicholas Rokoff death and immunity from suffering while it had meted to him the hideous terrors of an existence infinitely worse than the death that persistently refused to claim him.
We Russians, speaking generally, have never had those foolish transcendental "romantics"--German, and still more French--on whom nothing produces any effect; if there were an earthquake, if all France perished at the barricades, they would still be the same, they would not even have the decency to affect a change, but would still go on singing their transcendental songs to the hour of their death, because they are fools.
I have seen Russians devour, without being visibly inconvenienced, vegetable substances which would infallibly have killed a Neapolitan or an Arab.
The Russians have always a ship of war upon this station, and have already encroached upon the Californian boundaries, by taking possession of the port of Bondago, and fortifying it with several guns.
Two persons whose desires are moderate may live well enough in Brussels on an income which would scarcely afford a respectable maintenance for one in London: and that, not because the necessaries of life are so much dearer in the latter capital, or taxes so much higher than in the former, but because the English surpass in folly all the nations on God's earth, and are more abject slaves to custom, to opinion, to the desire to keep up a certain appearance, than the Italians are to priestcraft, the French to vain-glory, the Russians to their Czar, or the Germans to black beer.
So far as I could see, the party had already gained some notoriety in the place, which had come to look upon the General as a Russian nobleman of great wealth.
Fur Trade in the Pacific- American Coasting Voyages- Russian Enterprises.
You see, one Russian is a Frenchman, and I know my French pretty well.
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