put/set your house in order

put one's house in order

Fig. to put one's business or personal affairs into good order. (As if one were cleaning one's house. See also put one's own house in order.) There was some trouble in the department office and the manager was told to put his house in order. Every now and then, I have to put my house in order. Then life becomes more manageable.
See also: house, order, put

set one's house in order

Fig. to make certain that one's affairs are in proper legal order. Before we can ask for a bank loan, we have to set our house in order. I found an accountant who would help me set my house in order.
See also: house, order, set

put your house in order

or

get your house in order

COMMON If you put your house in order or get your house in order, you make sure that all your affairs are arranged properly and that all your problems are dealt with. The government has given the newspaper industry a twelve-month deadline to put its house in order or face tough new controls. As with individuals, no company can be successful until it has got its own internal house in order. Note: Verbs such as keep or set can be used instead of put or get. She claimed the high street banks were incapable of keeping their house in order.
See also: house, order, put

put (or set or get) your house in order

make necessary reforms.
2002 New York Times There will be no moral credibility for the bishops to speak about justice, truth, racial equality, war or immigration if they can't get their own house in order.
See also: house, order, put

put/set your (own) ˈhouse in order

organize your own business or improve your own behaviour before you try to criticize somebody else: A government official warned the newspaper industry to put its own house in order before it started to tell other industries how they should be run.
See also: house, order, put, set