push up daisies, to

push up (the) daisies

slang To be deceased. The phrase alludes to one having been buried, with daisies growing over one's burial plot. You'll be pushing up daisies when Mom finds out that you dented her brand-new car. I'll be pushing up the daisies long before the price of property goes down in our city.
See also: daisy, push, up
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

push up daisies

Be dead and buried, as in There is a cemetery full of heroes pushing up daisies. This slangy expression, alluding to flowers growing over a grave, was first recorded about 1918, in one of Wilfred Owen's poems about World War I.
See also: daisy, push, up
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

push up daisies

Slang
To be dead and buried: a cemetery of heroes pushing up daisies.
See also: daisy, push, up
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

push up daisies, to

Be dead and buried. The phrase was first recorded in 1918, in one of Wilfred Owen’s poems about World War I, and alludes to flowers growing over a soldier’s grave in France. It soon passed into the civilian vocabulary, where it continues to refer to being dead. Georgette Heyer had it in Blunt Instrument (1938): “‘Where is the wife now?’ . . . ‘Pushing up daisies. . . . died a couple of years ago.’”
See also: push, to, up
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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