push off


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Related to push off: push back, put off
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push off

1. Literally, to push against a dock in order to move one's boat away from shore. I'll need you to push off while I steer the boat.
2. By extension, to leave or depart. We both need to be up early tomorrow, so we'll be pushing off soon.
3. In some sports, to push another player in order to propel oneself away and create more distance from them, typically in order to get "open" to receive a pass, etc. Such a maneuver is typically against the rules. You can clearly see in the replay that Williams pushed off. The refs missed that one.
See also: off, push

push (oneself) off (on something)

[for someone in a boat] to apply pressure to something on the shore, thus propelling the boat and oneself away. The weekend sailor pushed himself off on the boat he had been moored to. We pushed off on the dock.
See also: off, push

push someone or something off (of) someone or something

 and push someone or something off
to apply pressure to and force someone or something off someone or something. (Of is usually retained before pronouns.) He continued to come at me, but I managed to push him off me and escape. I pushed off the attacker.
See also: off, push

push off

 and shove off
to leave. (As if one were pushing a boat away from a dock.) Well, it looks like it's time to push off. It's time to go. Let's shove off.
See also: off, push

push off

Also, shove off. Leave, set out, depart, as in The patrol pushed off before dawn, or It's time to shove off. This usage alludes to the literal meaning of a person in a boat pushing against the bank or dock to move away from the shore. [Colloquial; early 1900s]
See also: off, push

push off

v.
1. To shove or thrust something or someone from a place: She climbed up to the roof and pushed off the snow. He pushed a glass off the table, and it shattered.
2. To set out; depart: The infantry patrol pushed off before dawn.
3. To launch or move away by pushing against a surface: I can jump higher when I push off the ground with my left foot. We got in the boat and pushed off from the dock.
See also: off, push
References in periodicals archive ?
These help create the air bubbles that enable the lizard to push off and walk across the water.
FOLLOW ME, IT'S THIS WAY: Dean Hoyle leads the way as the riders get ready to set off from the Galpharm Stadium for Southend (PC050809Dbike-05) PUSH OFF: Town manager Lee Clark helps Town chairman Dean Hoyle get the Huddersfield to Southend ride under way Pictures by Peter Cottle (PC050809Dbike-03)
Push off one leg, driving toes down, and get as much vertical height as possible.
The emphasis is on the lifting, or step-up, action, not on a push off the ground.
Stand with feet shoulder width apart, hips low, hands at your sides near your ankles, push off explosively swinging arms forward covering as much lateral distance as possible.
Push off the back leg, driving the knee up and forward to get as much height and distance as possible Repeat alternating legs 10 times.
Prone push off underwater: Glide, pull (both arms) glide, whip kick, and glide to surface, streamlining with legal breaststroke start.
Push off on back and glide and flutter kick (dolphin kick optional) with arms extended as in prone glide (streamlining, 20-40 feet).
Always push off, streamlining with kick before using arms.
Prone push off glide (streamlining) with flutter kick (25-50 yards), get air when necessary.
As you do this, clear you feet backward and push off to the outside, resuming a good football position.
A small but ardent band of free thinkers are claiming that the back foot does not push off the rubber, but is pulled off by the powerful rotation of the hips and trunk.
Unlike the fullback dive, where he runs straight ahead with the ball covered up in the arms, the fullback must counter-step forward and push off his outside foot on his first cut - meanwhile looking for a blitzing LB.
The Z-back must take a lead step, cross-over, and then plant his foot and push off toward the trapping area.
They play a bail technique - align in a 45-degree stance and, on the snap, drop the back foot behind the body, push off the front foot, and immediately begin a three-step reading technique - running sideways to get into their area of responsibility.