push money


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push money

A sum of money that is paid to an employee as a bonus for encouraging customers to buy additional or more expensive goods or services. The tour company offers its guide push money if they can convince tourists to opt into the expensive river cruise. Without the offer of push money, we had little incentive to get customers to buy anything they didn't ask for directly.
See also: money, push

push money

n. extra money paid to a salesperson to sell certain merchandise aggressively. (see also spiff.) The manufacturer supplied a little push money that even the store manager didn’t know about.
See also: money, push
References in periodicals archive ?
The capacity limit for Supersports racing is 600cc, and all superbike classes around the world have an upper limit of 1,000cc, so why push money and development time into a sports machine that falls between the two classes?
Under these terms, customers will push money at casinos to the point of casinos becoming highly profitable.
Just as society quite rightly condemns those who would destroy lives through the supply of hard drugs - feeding an addiction they themselves have created - so we need to take action against those who would push money.
Precisely because of the challenge to push money out of politics and the diverse reform initiatives this hope prompted, the Progressive Era offers many lessons for current reformers.
The overall mix is precisely blended to push money managers' hot buttons.
Declining rates push money into the market, making it easier for companies to invest, points out Vivian Lewis, editor of Global Investing in New York City.
Trade tensions have push money into the safety of US bonds -- thus making the greenback less attractive.
Say 'Hi', put forward a big idea and volunteer for that new role but don't push money luck.
Early repayments of three-year central bank loans resume next week, meaning even more funds will be siphoned out of the markets, helping push money market rates up more.
The People's Bank of China (PBOC) wants to curtail funds that are flowing into the country's vast informal loans market and push money instead into more productive areas of the economy as it seeks to shore up growth.
A: Lush money, B: Push money, C: Hush money, D: Rush money 5.
It says: "In a general sense, grey hair doesn't hurt on this playing field: You don't need good hand-eye co-ordination or well-toned muscles to push money around (thank heavens)."