purge away

(redirected from purged away)

purge away

1. To clear something totally out or away from something. A noun or pronoun can be used between "purge" and "away." We'll need to purge away the contaminated coolant before we operate the machinery again. I recommend emptying the tank of your lawn mower after the winter to purge old fuel away.
2. To cleanse one's mind or soul of something impure. A noun or pronoun can be used between "purge" and "away." I recommend you turn to prayer to purge away those evil thoughts. Your obsessive focus on purging sin away from the souls of your congregation has become a sin unto itself.
See also: away, purge
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

purge something away

to wash or flush something away. We will purge the rusty water away and then start up the pump again. We will have fresh, clean water again in no time. Laura purged away the rusty water.
See also: away, purge
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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References in classic literature ?
The Meno goes back to a former state of existence, in which men did and suffered good and evil, and received the reward or punishment of them until their sin was purged away and they were allowed to return to earth.
Before he went to the gallows, Brown penned this prophecy, which he handed to his jailor: "I, John Brown, am now quite certain that the crimes of this guilty land will never be purged away but with blood.
John Brown wrote about slavery in his final note "I John Brown am now quite certain that the crimes of this guilty land will never be purged away, but with Blood.
The often-quoted message provides what is perhaps the most chilling prophecy in all of American history: "I, John Brown, am quite certain that the crimes of this guilty land will never be purged away but with blood."
636 A.D.), a Doctor of the Church, explains that these words "it shall not be forgiven him either in this world or the next" prove that in the next life "some sins will be forgiven and purged away by a certain purifying fire."
In "The Digging," Middleton excavates the century's mass graves, taunting us with remembered lines from Auden and Matthew Arnold: "Love one another, they said, as if a say-so / On Dover Beach, or in Manhattan, shamed the cruel, / As if it purged away the myth of purging." "Of Paradise" ironically suggests how our era is like that of Dante's inferno: "It is a tenuous time, a tenuous space, and it is not / Innocuous vegetation, love, serenity', or pie.
Hamlet hears that the late king, by all accounts an honorable man in the medieval sense of the word, has been sentenced to a "prison" in which he must burn until his sins are purged away. Yet, Hamlet chooses to swear in terms of Christian images; he tells Rosencrantz and Guildenstern that "by my fay I cannot reason" (2.2.251), and later swears by "Sblood" (2.2.336, 3.2.334), "God's bodkin" (2.2.485), "swounds" (2.2.528, 5.1.240), and "i'faith" (3.2.82).