in purdah

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in purdah

Secluded from view or from integration with others. Used especially in relation to traditional Hindu and Muslim beliefs that women should be separated from men. For many women in purdah in the small village, matters beyond the home and family were considered taboo.

in purdah

in seclusion.
Purdah comes from the curtain (parda ) used in traditional Hindu and Muslim households, especially in the Indian subcontinent, to conceal women from the eyes of strangers. The transferred use of this expression to refer to seclusion generally dates from the 1920s.
1998 Times Treasury ministers are, of course, in purdah.
References in periodicals archive ?
Plea had contested CBSE circular that banned purdah during the exam
As far as the first situation is concerned, that purdah ought to be enforced, that clearly falls in the category of actual/real coercion, while the second way of guided learning can be categorized as symbolic coercion.
Mr Wharton said: "Using Cleveland Police Authority resources to issue and publicise press releases attacking one political party is a breach of the spirit of the purdah rules, which prevent public institutions from entering political debate.
Purdah creates male space (public space) and female space (private space) and allocates the former to men and the latter to women.
The traditionalists were further concerned by her starting a school for girls which encouraged young Indians to reject the conventions of purdah, which had been perpetuated for centuries among the aristocratic classes.
Hindu, Muslim, and British women left their homes and visited the club, where it accommodated their needs, for instance, providing a refuge for Indian women who observed purdah.
It analyses representations of the role of women in terms of the "traditional" place of woman behind the screen of purdah, within the confines of the harem or haveli.
HONEYMOON IN PURDAH by Alison Wearing (Macmillan hb, pp 319, 14.
Landes argues, as did Mary Wollstonecraft, that (northern) European freedom for women, at least relative to purdah and footbinding, made for economic growth.
Imtiaz Dharker's new verse collection Postcards from God is an enlarged edition that contains poems from her first book, Purdah (1989), and her second (1994), beating the same title as the present volume.
He refers briefly to Mawdudi's book Purdah (Sayyid Abu'l A'la Mawdudi: Purdah and the Status of Women in Islam [1972]), but he does not probe very deeply into why this form of Islamic revivalism should focus so sharply on control of women as the lynch pin of morality.
Wife beating, emphasis on dowry instead of brideprice, and purdah were strong traditions under the British and continue in post-independence India.
And in its most extreme form, it leads to purdah, in which women are completely shrouded from public view.
One senses in the novel the loss of an old way that Attia Hosain fought, an old way that is more likely to remind one, in its sensibility and sense of closure, of the words of Egyptian feminist writer Nawal el-Saadawi, or of Naguib Mafouz-of literature from the Islamic world rather than that traditionally associated with India (Narayan's or Desai's), precisely because the heroine's life is so truncated, or disturbingly cut off from the public through the dilemma of purdah.
Another important finding was that of the restriction placed by purdah on womens' work: only 14 percent of women who observed purdah worked in the labour force as compared to 29 percent who did not observe purdah.
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