punctuate (something) with (something)

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punctuate (something) with (something)

1. Literally, to mark a particular clause, sentence, paragraph, etc., with a certain kind of punctuation mark. To be honest, I would punctuate this sentence with an em-dash between the two clauses rather than a semicolon. Never punctuate a sentence with a question mark and exclamation point side by side—choose one or the other.
2. To highlight or emphasize one's speech or writing with particular linguistic flairs, such as certain words or turns of phrase, body language, rhetorical devices, etc. She always punctuates her speech with these hand gestures that have since become something of a trademark for her during the campaign. His letter was punctuated with emotional appeals to the reader.
See also: punctuate
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

punctuate something with something

 
1. to add a particular punctuation mark to a piece of writing. You have punctuated this ad with too many exclamation points. This letter is punctuated with dashes to emphasize the key points.
2. to add emphasis to one's speaking by adding phrases, exclamations, or other devices. Her comments were punctuated with a few choice swear words. Tom punctuated his address with a few choice comments about politicians.
See also: punctuate
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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References in classic literature ?
Then discussions arise about the advisability of this road or that, what the best stopping-places may be, what running time I may expect to make, where the best trout streams are, and so forth, in which other men join, and which are punctuated with more drinks.
Using his long arms as a man uses crutches, and rolling his huge carcass from side to side with each stride, the great king ape paced to and fro, uttering deep growls, occasionally punctuated with the ear-piercing scream, than which there is no more terrifying noise in all the jungle.
As if in answer, a great screaming roar went up, dim with distance, punctuated with detonation after detonation.
It was a grim, a terrible silence, shot through with yellow-green light of ferocious eyes, punctuated with undulating tremors of sinuous tail.
The stripped rational aesthetic of the buildings has been described by the architect as 'stately', and will incorporate a fine grey Danish brick, punctuated with a regular pattern of large openings with aluminium sliding doors and balconies, or windows with solid spandrel panels beneath.
Punctuated with singing, passages from the Book of Mormon, and caricatured voices that range from a female Mormon psychotherapist to an offensive rendition of a Japanese businessman, the play is alternately funny and sad--and at its best moments, both.
Also present are giant black orbs from which muted rainbows flow like hand-cranked spaghetti, punctuated with signs and billboards.
He said a significant aspect of his walk with Lutherans is that it was punctuated with "almost unrelieved good news." Part of the reason is that bishops of both churches in Canada agreed in 1995 to meet regularly for 10 years.
In regions of northern Mall, the parched ground is punctuated with smoking, glowing holes that reach 750[degrees]C at their rims.
The biblical texts are punctuated with essays and commentaries written by an eclectic group of contributors that includes contemporary gospel recording artist John P.
The half hour of prayers and songs was punctuated with the frequent sounds of crying.
Designed by the Hillier Group, the buildings comprising Bridgewater Crossing are clad in two tones of red granite framed by fields of aqua glass curtain wall, punctuated with monumental glass and stainless steel entry canopies.
Corridors punctuated with interesting rest stops offer objects or activities for residents en route to shared lounges, recreational hubs, or the Wellness Center.
It tends to have large sweeps of the extremities punctuated with agitated shakes of the fingers and tiny steps of the feet, but his present company includes some of the strongest dancers in this town.
It is a simplistic journey into corruption punctuated with the theatrical charm of sliding scene changes which necessitated actors running behind the camera changing costume and makeup as the camera panned from summer to winter in single, nonstop shots.