pump


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be under the pump

To be under pressure to perform, succeed, or achieve results. Primarily heard in UK. The fast-food giant has been under the pump in the last few years, as sales and market share continue to slide. An ageing batsman, I was under the pump to show that I still had what it takes to be a great cricket player.
See also: pump

put (someone) under the pump

To put (someone) under pressure to perform, succeed, or achieve results. Primarily heard in UK. The fast-food giant has been put under the pump in the last few years by dropping sales and sliding market value. The cricket community has really put the ageing batsman under the pump to deliver results this season, or else consider retirement.
See also: pump, put

under the pump

Under pressure to perform, succeed, or achieve results. Primarily heard in Australia. The fast-food giant has been under the pump in the last few years, as sales and market share continue to slide. An ageing batsman, I found myself under the pump to show that I still had what it takes to be a great cricket player.
See also: pump

prime the pump

To take action that encourages the growth of something or helps it to succeed. While the government was forced to slash public expenditures following the major economic crash, they've recently begun priming the pump again across the public sectors. The only way we'll get this project off the ground is if one of the directors of the company primes the pump.
See also: prime, pump

pump iron

To lift weights at a gym to improve one's body shape or increase one's muscle mass. My brother-in-law is obsessed with pumping iron and getting huge biceps.
See also: iron, pump

pump (someone or oneself) up

To increase someone's or one's own excitement, confidence, or mental preparation. The coach pumped us all up just before we headed out onto the field. I was pretty nervous before the test, so I took a few minutes to pump myself up before I started.
See also: pump, up

pump (some) iron

Sl. to lift weights for exercise. Andy went down to the gym to pump some iron. Mary's hobbies are pumping iron and running.
See also: iron, pump

pump someone for something

Inf. to try to get information about something out of someone. The representative of the other company pumped Harry for information, but he refused to say anything. Are you trying to pump me for company secrets?
See also: pump

pump someone up (for something)

Inf. to get someone, including oneself, mentally ready for something. The coach tried to pump the team up so they would win. The coach talked and talked to pump them up.
See also: pump, up

pump something into someone or something

 and pump something in
to try to force something, such as a gas, liquid, information, or money into someone or something. First you have to pump some air into the ball to make it hard. I pumped in the air. The hospital oxygen system pumped life-giving oxygen into Karen's lungs.
See also: pump

pump something out of someone or something

 and pump something out
to remove something from someone or something by force or suction. The doctors pumped the poison out of her stomach. They pumped out the poison.
See also: of, out, pump

pump something through something

to force something, such as a gas or fluid, through something. They pumped crude oil through this pipeline, all the way to the south shore. They pumped fresh air through the sewers while the workers were working inside.
See also: pump, through

pump something up

 
1. to inflate something. Do you have something with which I can pump my basketball up? I pumped up the ball just an hour ago.
2. Sl. to exercise to make muscles get bigger and stronger. The body builder pumped her muscles up in preparation for the competition. She pumped up her muscles.
See also: pump, up

prime the pump

Encourage the growth or action of something, as in Marjorie tried to prime the pump by offering some new issues for discussion. In the late 1800s this expression originally was used for pouring liquid into a pump to expel the air and make it work. In the 1930s it was applied to government efforts to stimulate the economy and thereafter was applied to other undertakings.
See also: prime, pump

pump iron

Lift weights, as in She's started pumping iron three times a week. This idiom was born with the late-20th-century stress on physical fitness. [Second half of 1900s]
See also: iron, pump

pump up

1. Inflate with gas or air, as in This tire needs pumping up. [Late 1800s]
2. Fill with enthusiasm, strength, and energy, as in The lively debate pumped us all up. Mary Wollstonecraft used this idiom in slightly different form in The Rights of Women (1792): "Lover-like phrases of pumped-up passion."
See also: pump, up

pump iron

If someone pumps iron, they lift heavy weights for exercise. Unlike Richard, I hadn't spent hours pumping iron and running on the treadmill.
See also: iron, pump

prime the pump

mainly AMERICAN, JOURNALISM
COMMON If someone primes the pump, they take action to help something succeed or develop, usually by spending money on it. He said he would consider priming the pump through increased spending on roads or housing if the economy declined more rapidly than expected. Note: You can also talk about pump-priming, or say that someone pump-primes an economy or a project. I think we are going to have to do some more pump-priming in order to get the economy going. The plan offers a way of pump-priming an economy which is growing too slowly. Note: To prime a water pump means to pump it until it is full of water and all the air has been forced out, so that it is ready to be used.
See also: prime, pump

all hands to the pumps

used to indicate that everyone is urgently needed to help out in an emergency.
The expression originated in nautical parlance, and hand in that context means ‘a member of the crew’.
2004 Bolton Evening News If we find ourselves struggling and needing the points then it's going to be all hands to the pumps.
See also: all, hand, pump

prime the pump

stimulate or support the growth or success of something, especially by supplying it with money.
This phrase is used literally of a mechanical pump into which a small quantity of water needs to be poured before it can begin to function.
1977 Tom Sharpe The Great Pursuit Significance is all…Prime the pump with meaningful hogwash.
See also: prime, pump

pump iron

exercise with weights. informal
See also: iron, pump

pump ship

urinate. euphemistic
The expression originated in nautical terminology, denoting the pumping of water from a ship's bilges.
See also: pump, ship

prime the ˈpump

give somebody, an organization, etc. financial help in order to support a project, business, etc. when it is beginning: The government should really prime the pump in new high technology projects. That’s the only way they’ll be able to survive in the current economic climate. ▶ ˈpump-priming noun: The nation is relying on pump-priming to get the economy started.Originally, this was a way of making a pump work properly by adding water to it.
See also: prime, pump

pump somebody full of something

fill somebody with something, especially drugs: They pumped her full of painkillers.
See also: full, of, pump, somebody, something

pump ˈiron

(informal) do exercises in which you lift heavy weights in order to strengthen your muscles: I should take more exercise, but I’m not interested in pumping iron at the local gym three evenings a week.
See also: iron, pump

pump somebody’s ˈstomach

remove the contents of somebody’s stomach using a pump, because they have swallowed something harmful: She had to go to the hospital and have her stomach pumped. ▶ ˈstomach pump noun
See also: pump, stomach

pump out

v.
1. To force or suck something, as a liquid or gas, out of something by means of a pump: The contractors pumped the water out of the ditch. They pumped out the sewage that had flooded the basement.
2. To force the liquid or gas out of something by means of a pump: When the rain finally stopped, we rented a sump pump and pumped out our basement. The holes had filled with water, so the contractors pumped them out before pouring the concrete footings.
3. To flow out of something rapidly and forcefully: When the firefighters arrived, smoke was pumping out of the windows. Blood was pumping out, so the doctor tied a tourniquet around the patient's arm.
4. To produce something continuously and in large amounts: That factory pumps out a lot of toxic waste. Movie sequels continue to make money, and studios continue to pump them out.
See also: out, pump

pump up

v.
1. To inflate something with gas by using a pump: We pumped up a new basketball before the game. One of my tires was getting low, so I stopped at a gas station and pumped it up.
2. To force or suck something, as a liquid or gas, from beneath a surface by using a pump: This well pumps up oil from underground. We pump the water up from the lake to tanks on the hillside.
3. Slang To fill someone with enthusiasm, strength, and energy; psych someone up: The crowd's chants pumped up the players. The coach pumped us up for the big game with a rousing speech.
4. Slang To be actively involved in bodybuilding exercises: The football players are always pumping up at the gym.
5. Slang To strengthen something: Pump up the volume on that stereo—I can't hear it. The economy was declining, but investors hoped that a favorable exchange rate would pump it up.
See also: pump, up

pump

1. tv. to press someone for an answer or information. Don’t pump me! I will tell you nothing!
2. n. the heart. (see also ticker.) He has the pump of a forty-year-old.
3. n. a pumped-up muscle. (Bodybuilding.) He’s tired and can’t quite make a pump.

pump ship

1. tv. to urinate. (Crude. From an expression meaning to pump the bilge water from a ship.) He stopped and pumped ship right in the alley.
2. tv. to empty one’s stomach; to vomit. (Crude. Less well known than the previous sense.) After I pumped ship, I felt better.
See also: pump, ship

pump (some) iron

tv. to lift weights. Andy went down to the gym to pump some iron.
See also: iron, pump

pump iron

verb
See also: iron, pump

pump (someone) up

tv. & in. to excite someone; to make someone enthusiastic. The coach gave a pep talk to pump the players up for the big game.
See also: pump, up

pump up

verb
See also: pump, up

pump something up

tv. to flex and tense a muscle until it is expanded to its fullest size, as with thighs and forearms. (Bodybuilding.) She pumped up her thighs and struck a pose.
See also: pump, something, up

prime the pump

Informal
To encourage the growth or action of something.
See also: prime, pump

pump iron

Sports
To lift weights.
See also: iron, pump

all hands to the pumps

Help! The phrase comes from sailing days when a leak in the hull required immediate help in bailing out the incoming seawater. A variant is “all hands and the cook on deck,” meaning the entire ship's roster was needed in an emergency, even the cook, who was never expected to participate in mariner activities.
See also: all, hand, pump
References in periodicals archive ?
The 89-year old Hydraulic Institute, the largest association of pump producers in North America, is a global authority on pumps and pumping systems.
Delivery mechanism: electric motor with Rexroth pumps
After running the trial into late October, GLPF placed an order for five 40 HP M80FP Nikuni pumps to allow them to eliminate compressed air demand and reduced the horsepower currently used by 85 per unit for a total savings of over 425 HP.
Larger pumps usually are available from specialist rental companies or pump distributors and manufacturers, some of whom often serve as subcontractors on large utility projects, not only providing necessary pumps, but also designing and constructing complete bypass systems, operating and maintaining the system, and removing pumps and other components when the project is complete.
However, past studies didn't investigate the chemicals' effects on the cellular bilge pumps, which scientists call efflux pumps, multidrug-resistance transporters, and various other names.
McCarthy, who has owned her own heat pump for about a year, says, "It's a quiet system and I am completely unaware it's there.
An electromagnetic pump with a computer-controlled flow rate is employed to fill the mold.
According to Carse, a survey conducted by Ford shows that 60% of drivers will ignore tire deflation alarms, and research from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) shows: about 10% of gas station air pumps don't work, less than 50% are equipped with pressure gauges, and 30% overstate tire pressure.
The ZP gear pump thus met with great interest at the exhibition and has established a strong position on the market during the last few years.
HEART FAILURE OCCURS WHEN the heart loses its ability to pump enough blood through the body.
Product Overview II-5 Types of Pumps II-5 Air Pumps II-5 Cryogenic Pumps II-5 Liquid Pumps II-5 Peristaltic Pump II-5 Variable Flow Peristaltic Pumps II-6 Piston Pumps II-6 Diaphragm Pump II-6 Vacuum Pumps II-7 Gear Pumps II-7 Hydraulic Pumps II-7 Centrifugal Pumps II-7 Metering Pumps II-8 Rotary Vane Pumps II-8 Determinants in Selecting a Pump II-8 Pressure Rating II-8 Pump Size II-8 Speed of a Pump II-8 Rate of Fluid Flow II-8 Efficiency II-8 Effect of Chemicals II-9 Size and Weight II-9 Environment II-9 Pumps: A Right Choice II-9 Materials of Construction and their Chemical Compatibility II-10
INDUSTRY OVERVIEW II-1 Breast Milk: The 'Super Food' for Infants II-1 Recession in Retrospect and the Road Ahead II-4 Competition II-4 Leading Breast Pump Companies/Brands: Brief Company Description and Key Products Offered II-5 Provision of Information Will Be Key for Gaining Consumer Acceptance II-6 2.
Technological advancements in screw pump technologies has given birth to a number of multiple-axis technologies that are employed across various end user segments for multiple applications.
Proprietary components include line of metering pumps, which (according to company) offer greater volumetric efficiency and a higher case-pressure rating than standard pumps and magnetic-drive couplings for a sealless, leakless interface between pump and motor.
The pump rarely returns to peak performance after a rebuild and production upsets are common towards the end of the rebuild wear cycle.