pulse

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Related to pulses: Legumes, peripheral pulses

(one's) finger on the pulse

A keen awareness of current trends and happenings. Sara really has her finger on the pulse of nightlife in the city, so I would ask her where you should have your birthday party.
See also: finger, on, pulse

feel the pulse of (something)

To use one's intuition to identify the current mood or feeling of a person, group, or setting. Try to feel the pulse of the crowd. If they seem bored, play some more upbeat songs.
See also: feel, of, pulse

get (someone's) pulse racing

To excite, thrill, or exhilarate someone. You could feel it in the air that the singer's performance was getting everyone's pulse racing. Her quick, sultry glances from across the room got my pulse racing.
See also: get, pulse, race

get pulses racing

To be very thrilling, exhilarating, or exciting. You could feel it in the air that the singer's performance was getting pulses racing. She has an intense, smoldering stare that gets pulses positively racing.
See also: get, pulse, race

have (one's) finger on the pulse

To be very aware of current trends and happenings in a particular place. Sara really has her finger on the pulse of nightlife in the city, so I would ask her where you should have your birthday party.
See also: finger, have, on, pulse

keep (one's) finger on the pulse (of something)

To maintain an awareness of current trends and happenings in a particular place, situation, or environment. Sara always keeps her finger on the pulse of city's nightlife, so I would ask her where you should have your birthday party. You've got to keep your finger on the pulse if you want to remain relevant in this industry.
See also: finger, keep, on, pulse

pulse through (someone or something)

To flow through something in a surge or throb, or a rhythmical series thereof. Electricity pulsed through the generator. Blood was pulsing through my temple as I tried to regain my breath.
See also: pulse, through

quicken the/(one's) pulse

To fill one with excitement, interest, or anticipation. Few things quicken the pulse like sky diving. Unfortunately, the only thing that quickened my pulse during this movie was the beginning action sequence. The rest was a bore.
See also: pulse

set (someone's) pulse racing

To excite, thrill, or exhilarate someone. You could feel it in the air that the singer's performance was setting everyone's pulse racing. Her quick, sultry glances from across the room set my pulse racing.
See also: pulse, race, set

set pulses racing

To be very thrilling, exhilarating, or exciting. You could feel it in the air that the singer's performance was setting pulses racing. She has an intense, smoldering stare that sets pulses positively racing.
See also: pulse, race, set

take (someone's or something's) pulse

1. Literally, to measure the heart rate of a person or animal in order to determine if they are alive or in good health. The doctor tried to take the poor man's pulse but declared him dead on the spot. She's taking the dog's pulse to see if he needs to go to the vet.
2. By extension, to gauge, measure, or get a sense of how well someone or something is performing, thriving, managing, coping, etc. We try to take our employees' pulse at the start of every year to see gauge the level of their morale. The analysis promises to take the economy's pulse and give clear predictions of the market's ability to grow over the next few years.
See also: pulse, take

take the pulse of (something)

To sense, determine, or judge the mood, feeling, or status of a particular group, setting, or environment. Try to take the pulse of the crowd. If they seem bored, play some more upbeat songs. We've been trying to take the pulse of voters ahead of the election, and so far it has been almost exactly split down the middle between the two candidates.
See also: of, pulse, take

keep one's finger on the pulse of something

Fig. to monitor the current state of something frequently. I have to keep my finger on the pulse of the city if I want to be a good reporter. It is hard to keep your finger on the pulse of Washington, D.C., but a U.S. senator must do it.
See also: finger, keep, of, on, pulse

pulse through someone or something

to flow or surge through someone or something. A jolt of electricity pulsed through Sam, causing him to jerk his hand away from the wire. They repaired the power lines and electricity began to pulse through the wires again.
See also: pulse, through

take someone's pulse

to measure the frequency of the beats of a person's pulse. I can take my own pulse. The nurse took my pulse and said I was fine.
See also: pulse, take

take the pulse of something

Fig. to sample or survey something to learn about its progress or state. Two executives came in to take the pulse of the local business unit.
See also: of, pulse, take

take the pulse of

Also, feel the pulse of. Try to determine the intentions or sentiments of a person or group, as in These exit polls allegedly take the pulse of the voters, but I don't believe they're very meaningful . [First half of 1600s] Also see feel out.
See also: of, pulse, take

have your finger on the pulse

COMMON If you have your finger on the pulse, you know all the latest information about something or understand it very well. She had her finger on the pulse of the consumer-led Eighties generation. Note: You can also say that someone keeps their finger on the pulse if they make an effort to stay aware of new developments. It's important to keep your finger on the pulse by reading all the right magazines and newspapers. Note: People sometimes say that someone has their finger on the button. Hart is a businessman with his finger on the button. Note: Someone's pulse is the speed and force with which their blood vessels expand and contract as their heart beats. A doctor might feel a patient's pulse by pressing a finger lightly against the large artery in their wrist.
See also: finger, have, on, pulse

have (or keep) your finger on the pulse

be aware of all the latest news or developments.
See also: finger, have, on, pulse

feel (or take) the pulse of

ascertain the general mood or opinion of.
The image here is of literally determining someone's heart rate by feeling and timing the pulsation of an artery.
1994 Daily Mirror Our new Housing Monitor…will take the pulse of the housing market to keep you informed about the value of your most precious asset—your home.
See also: feel, of, pulse

have/keep your finger on the ˈpulse (of something)

know all that is happening; be aware of new developments in a particular situation: Successful politicians need to keep their finger on the pulse of the voters.
A doctor takes your pulse by putting his fingers on your wrist and counting the number of times the blood beats in a minute.
See also: finger, have, keep, on, pulse

take the pulse of

To judge the mood or views of (a political electorate, for example): The politician was able to take the pulse of the grass-roots voters.
See also: of, pulse, take
References in periodicals archive ?
To a query that how can Pakistan promote pulses, he recommended, they they have to work on availability of quality seed, selection of fertile land and improvement in marketing system to invite farmers attention towards production of pulses.
was spending huge amount Rs 102 billions on import of pulses
Supply of meat is not keeping pace with population growth and therefore production of pulses is required, report says
Irradiating CNT cathodes with infrared laser pulses led to pulsed field emission [10,18,26].
The coefficients of the floating and sunken pulses along with the P-H curve were obtained to determine the degrees of the floating and sunken pulses [4].
Pulses have made headlines this year because the United Nations declared 2016 the International Year of Pulses.
It is no wonder that UN Secretary General Ban-ki Moon declared 2016 as the Year of the Pulses. The FAO (Food and Agricultural Organization) has launched a pulse awareness year to teach people about the advantages of pulses.
As described in ISO 16750-2:2010, the associated load-dump pulse (designated pulses 5a and 5b [clamped] in ISO and SAE standards) has an amplitude from 79 V to 101 V in a 12-V system and lasts from 40 ms to 400 ms.
Therefore, UWB radar needs to implement a pulse generator with a 2 ns pulse width to satisfy the regulations of the FCC.
Beyond traditional markets, pulses have steadily increased in popularity as people around the world recognise their appeal as nutritious, versatile foods that can play an essential part in healthy diets.
In these ultra-wideband communication and radar applications, step, Gaussian, and monocycle pulses are very important.
The reason why the radial artery is used as the place of pulse taking is because though there are many accessible arteries all over the body such as the carotid femoral and posterior tibial artery pulses, the radial artery is centrally located in the body, being neither too far nor too close from the major solid and hollow organs.
Although pulses are excellent sources of nutrition with numerous health-promoting benefits, they do not make a significant contribution to the North American diet.
coli ATCC 11775 and Listeria innocua ATCC 33090 in whole milk were inactivated by scientists using single- and multi-pulsed (up to 10 pulses) high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) treatments.