pull up

(redirected from pulled him up)

pull (one) up on (something)

To hold one responsible or accountable for something they did or said. The boss pulled Larry up for his erratic behavior and sloppy attire. The reporter repeatedly pulled the senator up for his comments about mental health issues.
See also: on, pull, up

pull up

1. To lift someone or something up; to place or position someone or something upward or upright. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "pull" and "up." Dad pulled him up out of the water. He pulled up the mirror so that it rested against the wall.
2. To bring something close to someone or something else. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "pull" and "up." Why don't you pull up a chair and we can discuss the issue? Pull your seat up here next to me.
3. To maneuver something (typically a vehicle) alongside or in front of something or someone and bring it to a halt. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "pull" and "up." He pulled his car up alongside mine and handed me the package. The police pulled up to the building and called for backup.
4. To procure and open a source of information about someone or something. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "pull" and "up." I pulled her up on social media and learned that she was an investment banker. I'm pulling up an article on 18th-century wig making for a paper I'm writing.
5. To reach the position or place of someone or something positioned ahead of oneself. The champion runner got off to a rough start but quickly pulled up and passed by the competition.
6. To force the nose of an airplane upward, so as to reduce its descent or increase its ascent. Pilot, you need to pull up or you're going to hit the runway! He pulled up to avoid hitting the top of the skyscraper.
7. To pull a plant out of the soil. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "pull" and "up." If you don't pull weeds up by the root, they'll always grow back. My back aches from pulling up carrots all morning.
8. To stop moving or take a break. This town looks nice enough—let's pull up here for the night and get back on the road in the morning.
See also: pull, up

pull someone or something up

to drag or haul someone or something upward or to an upright position. Bob had slipped down into the creek, so I reached down and pulled him up. I pulled up Bob and nearly fell in myself. Nick pulled the cushion up and propped it against the back of the sofa.
See also: pull, up

pull something up (out of something)

to draw something upward out of something. The worker pulled a cold wet dog up out of the pond. He pulled up the dog out of the pond.
See also: pull, up

pull up

(somewhere) Go to haul up (somewhere).
See also: pull, up

pull up

1. Stop or cause to stop, as in He pulled up his horse, or They pulled up in front of the door. [Early 1600s]
2. Catch up, advance in relation to others, as in a race. For example, She was behind at the start, but she quickly pulled up. [Late 1800s] Also see pull oneself up by one's bootstraps.
See also: pull, up

pull up

v.
1. To obtain something by drawing or pulling upwards: I pulled up a large fish yesterday with my new fishing pole. I'll tie the bucket to the rope, and you pull it up to the roof.
2. To uproot something, especially a plant: We pulled up several large weeds from the garden. If you want to get rid of the ivy, you can't just cut it down, you have to pull it up.
3. To draw something close by and make it available for use: I pulled up a chair and sat down. Let's pull a few more seats up to the table for the new guests.
4. To bring some vehicle to a halt alongside something: The drivers must pull up their trucks to the curb before loading them. She pulled the bus up to the school entrance to let the children out.
5. To come to a halt alongside something. Used of vehicles and riders: The truck pulled up to the gas pump. I pulled up to the tollbooth and paid the toll.
6. To move to a position or place ahead, as in a race; catch up: The track star pulled up and passed the leader in the final lap, winning the race.
See also: pull, up