pull in

(redirected from pull someone)

pull in

1. To drive up to and park at some location. Let me pull in at a gas station and then I'll call you back. The train didn't pull in until nearly 11 PM due to all the delays.
2. To restrain, limit, or keep someone or oneself in check. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "pull" and "in." You need to pull your reporters in a bit—they're getting a bit too aggressive with their questions. I tried to pull myself in a bit, but I lost control and started yelling.
3. To take someone into custody as a suspect or person of interest in a crime. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "pull" and "in." They pulled the husband in for questioning, but he was released without charge. I hope for everyone's sake you pulled in the right person.
4. To yield a profit of a stated sum of money. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "pull" and "in." Their latest product has already pulled in nearly $15 million in its first two months on the market.
See also: pull

pull in(to) (some place)

To drive up to and park at some location. Let me pull into a gas station and I'll call you back. The train didn't pull in until nearly 11 PM due to all the delays.
See also: pull

pull in(to some place)

to drive into some place. A strange car just pulled into our driveway. Some stranger just pulled in.
See also: pull

pull in

1. Arrive at a destination, as in The train pulled in right on time. [c. 1900]
2. Rein in, restrain, as in She pulled in her horse, or The executives did not want to pull in their most aggressive salesmen. [c. 1600]
3. Arrest a suspect, as in The police said they could pull him in on lesser charges. [Late 1800s]
See also: pull

pull in

v.
1. To draw or haul something or someone inward or inside: When I offered to help him get out of the pool, he pulled me in. She grabbed my hand and pulled me in the room. The fishermen pulled in the nets and collected the fish.
2. To arrive at a place. Used of vehicles, passengers, or drivers: I got to the station just as the train was pulling in. We pulled in after midnight and quietly shut the car doors so we wouldn't wake anyone.
3. To involve someone in an activity or situation. Used chiefly in the passive: I got pulled into the scam because I thought I was going to make money.
4. To restrain someone; rein someone in: The commander pulled in the maverick officer.
5. To arrest someone: The police pulled me in for questioning. The police pulled in two of the suspects on drug charges.
6. To earn or yield some amount of money: The film has pulled in $30 million since its release.
See also: pull
References in periodicals archive ?
Collins countered that the law as it currently stands already allows police to pull someone over if they are holding a cell phone.
It may be necessary to pull someone aside to explain the facts of life to them.
Some are slow, far too slow to pull someone out to sea, but the speed of the current can change quickly.
But we must fulfill it anyway-out of love, out of faith, out of our human sense of urgency to pull someone away from the brink.
The United States is a tough nation to pull someone out from if they are legally on the US soil but the stakes are now getting stiff and US President Barack Obama cannot blink.
Washed away ground or holes under the surface are tripping hazards, and the suction or pressure of small drains can pull someone under shallow water," he cautions.
If he had a good heart, it was because his favourite form of exercise was to bend down and pull someone out of the gutter," Recto said.
If he had a good heart, it was because his favorite form of exercise was to bend down and pull someone out of the gutter," Recto added.
By telling a person you'll help him or her find support, you can help pull someone out of despair, depression and a dark hole," Jason emphasises.
They really need to pull someone in from the outside, and sometimes, the best option is more of a mediator than the police or adult protective services," she says, noting that ombudsmen usually take a person-centered approach.
Recovery and extension straps and shackles: You need to be prepared to get pulled free or pull someone else free.
It could buy equipment which helps them pull someone from the water alive.
Note: Officers can pull someone over for seeing this alone; they needn't witness the motorist commit any other offense.
Sometimes a supervisor will pull someone aside and say, 'You need to go home and change,'" she said, but added that no supervisor has ever had to do that repeatedly with the same employee.
We made that decision in the knowledge that if a specialist batsman got injured, we'd have to pull someone out of the performance squad that has been training in South Africa and has gone back to England only very recently," Flower explained.