pull (oneself) together

(redirected from pull herself together)

pull (oneself) together

To calm oneself down and begin to think or act appropriately. I know you're stressed out, but you need to pull yourself together and get this report done! I hope she pulls herself together soon. We need her to be focused.
See also: pull, together

pull together

1. To unify, consolidate, or join together the efforts or resources of a group or team. I know we're behind schedule, but if we pull together, we should be able to get this finished on time. The president is urging all citizens to pull together following the tragic event.
2. To move or organize things closer to one another. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "pull" and "together." Please pull the desks together so we can use them as a table. If it's too bright in here, I can pull together those curtains.
3. To create or organize something. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "pull" and "together." I know it can be tough to pull together a nutritious meal at the end of a long day, but your body will thank you for it! I'm trying to pull a meeting together for this Friday.
4. To assemble or compile things from various places or sources. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "pull" and "together." The police are pulling together all the facts to try to figure out what happened last night. We're pulling employee surveys together from our branches around the country.
See also: pull, together

pull oneself together

 
1. Fig. to compose oneself; to gather one's wits about one. I have to pull myself together and try it again. Now try to pull yourself together and get through this crisis.
2. Fig. to gather up one's things; to pull one's things together. I'll be ready to leave as soon as I pull myself together. I want to pull myself together and leave.
See also: pull, together

pull something together

 
1. Lit. to close something, such as a pair of drapes or sliding doors. Please pull the doors together when you finish in the closet. Would you pull the drapes together before you turn on the lights?
2. Fig. to assemble something, such as a meal. I will hardly have time to pull a snack together. I will pull a nice dinner together for the two of us.
3. Fig. to organize something; to arrange something. How about a party? I'll see if I can pull something together for Friday night.
4. Fig. to tidy things up; to straighten things up and make them orderly. This place is a mess. Please pull things together.
See also: pull, together

pull together (as a team)

to cooperate; to work well together. Let's all pull together and get this done. If we pull together as a team, we can get this job done on time.
See also: pull, together

pull oneself together

Regain one's composure or self-control, as in After that frightening episode, it took her a while to pull herself together. [Second half of 1800s]
See also: pull, together

pull together

1. Make a joint effort, cooperate, as in If we pull together, I'm sure we'll meet our quota. [Late 1700s]
2. pull something together. Assemble or gather together, as in Once we pull together all the facts, we'll understand the situation. [Late 1800s] Also see pull oneself together.
See also: pull, together

pull together

cooperate in a task or undertaking.
See also: pull, together

pull yourself together

recover control of your emotions.
See also: pull, together

pull yourself toˈgether

bring your feelings under control and start acting normally; stop feeling sorry for yourself: I know she’s upset but it’s time for her to pull herself together and stop crying. OPPOSITE: go (all) to pieces
See also: pull, together

pull together

v.
1. To draw some things closer to each other: We pulled our chairs together so that we could talk.
2. To bring together things gathered from several sources; compile something: The report pulls together findings from previous studies. The way you've written the ending is good—it pulls the whole story together. The tragedy has pulled the community closer together.
3. To make a joint effort toward a common goal; cooperate: The whole community pulled together to rebuild the school that had burned down.
4. To make oneself calm and tranquil. Used reflexively: Stop crying and pull yourself together!
See also: pull, together

pull (oneself) together

To regain one's composure.
See also: pull, together

pull together

To make a joint effort.
See also: pull, together
References in classic literature ?
So he would carry on, becoming half hysterical himself, which was an unbearable thing to see in a big man; Ona would pull herself together and fling herself into his arms, begging him to stop, to be still, that she would be better, it would be all right.
He expected, of course, his wife to be very much upset, but he wanted her to pull herself together. He needed all her assistance and all her loyalty in these new conjunctures his fatalism had already accepted.
After a long spell she seemed sinking off to sleep, but with an effort seemed to pull herself together and shook it off.
Tim tells Eileen to pull herself together and come back to work, while the boys are delighted that Ed and Aggie are reunited.
Coronation Street 7.30pm Emma announces she is leaving Weatherfield, Tim tells Eileen to pull herself together, and Bethany informs Daniel that she is going to write up her experience with Nathan.
KYLIE COCKBURN was preparing to make history and knew the time had come to pull herself together.
(https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qvJ3O_eizSs) In the promo video for the ABC soap opera, Carly (Laura West) tells Ava (Maura West) to pull herself together and step up.
The Czech showed tremendous resilience to pull herself together and is now among the frontrunners to clinch this weekend's women's singles crown at the Dubai Tennis Championships.
She also needed time to pull herself together after the April 2016 passing of old friend Prince, who died of a drug overdose.
"She'd bow her head because she was about to cry, then she'd pull herself together and sit up again.
Garry has had enough of Britt's selfishness and tells her to pull herself together and return home to Colin and the children.
Suggestions that she should "pull herself together" or that we should force her to do something aren't helpful.
When I turned, the one in front hit my baby," she said amid tears, forcing the court to give her time to pull herself together.