pull away from (someone or something)

pull away from (someone or something)

1. To withdraw or move backward from someone or something. I pulled away from Jana as she leaned in to kiss me. You can tell they used cheap glue because the stickers are already beginning to pull away from the toy.
2. To drag, haul, or force someone or something away from someone or something else. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "pull" and "away." She pulled me away from the road just as the bus careered past. I pulled the two-by-four away from the sawblades when I realized that it was the wrong piece.
3. Of a vehicle, to begin moving forward and away from someone or something. It was only once the train started pulling away from the station that I realized I'd left my laptop onboard. I waved to her through the window as the bus pulled away from me.
4. To move to a superior position in a competition, either physically or figuratively. It was neck and neck for most of the race, but the blue car pulled away from the rest during the final lap. The political newcomer has begun pulling away from the incumbent senator in the polls.
5. To withdraw socially or emotionally from someone. I feel like Sarah has been pulling away from us over the last few weeks. I hope something isn't seriously wrong. Please don't pull away from your friends in a time of crisis—we just want to help you!
See also: away, pull

pull someone or something away from someone or something

 and pull someone or something away
to grasp and haul someone or something away from someone or something. The lady pulled the child away from the edge of the well. Please pull your dog away from my hedge. Pull away that dog, or I will call the police!
See also: away, pull

pull away from someone or something

to jerk away or draw away from someone or something. Suddenly, she pulled away from me and fled. The car pulled away from the curb and drove off.
See also: away, pull