pull (someone or something) back

pull (someone or something) back

To pull, tug, or haul someone or something backwards or away from something. He pulled the small child back from the street. I pulled the curtains back and saw that it had been snowing overnight.
See also: back, pull

pull back

To back away, withdraw, or retreat. We're being fired at by someone in the rooftops; everyone, pull back! I pulled back a bit when I realized that I had been putting too much pressure on my pupil.
See also: back, pull

pull someone or something back (from someone or something)

to grasp and haul someone or something away from someone or something. The cop pulled the kid away from the other kid and made them stop fighting. I pulled back the child from the dangerous hole.
See also: back, pull

pull back (from someone or something)

to move back from someone or something. When I saw how sick he looked, I pulled back from him in shock. I took one look at the snake and pulled back.
See also: back, pull

pull back

Retreat, as in The troops gradually pulled back. [Mid-1500s]
See also: back, pull

pull back

v.
1. To haul or tug something or someone backward: I pulled my hair back and put it in a ponytail. She pulled back the curtain and looked outside. He pulled me back from the edge of the cliff.
2. To withdraw or retreat: The firefighters pulled back when the fire reached the gas tanks.
3. To order someone to withdraw or retreat: The commander pulled the troops back to a safer position. Aid organizations are pulling back volunteers until the fighting in that area stops.
See also: back, pull