pull/make faces/a face

make a face

 (at someone) and make faces (at someone)
1. to show a funny or distorted expression to someone in ridicule. Mother, Billy made a face at me! The teacher sent Jane to the principal for making a face in class.
2. to attempt to communicate to someone through facial gestures, usually an attempt to say "no" or "stop." I started to tell John where I was last night, but Bill made a face so I didn't. John made a face at me as I was testifying, so I avoided telling everything.
See also: face, make

make faces

(at someone) Go to make a face (at someone).
See also: face, make

make a face

Grimace, distort the facial features, as in The teacher told Joan to stop making faces at Mary. This expression was first recorded in 1570.
See also: face, make

make a face

or

pull a face

BRITISH
COMMON If you make a face or pull a face, you show a feeling such as dislike by twisting your face into an ugly expression. She made a face at the smell, and hurried to open the windows. He was taught from an early age to address people as `Mister' and not to poke his tongue out or pull faces. Note: If someone makes or pulls a particular kind of face, they show that feeling in their expression. `Here I am,' Chee said. `What can I do?' Janet made a wry face. He pulled funny faces at her and cracked a few jokes.
See also: face, make

make (or pull) a face (or faces)

produce an expression on your face that shows dislike, disgust, or some other negative emotion, or that is intended to be amusing.
See also: face, make

pull/make ˈfaces/a ˈface (at somebody/something)

produce an expression on your face to show that you do not like somebody/something or in order to make somebody laugh: What are you pulling a face at now?The little girl stood outside the window of the cafe making faces at everybody. ▶ ˈface-pulling noun: He amazed the audience with his silent mime and face-pulling performance.
See also: face, make, pull

make a face

To distort the features of the face; grimace.
See also: face, make