ptomaine


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to ptomaine: ptomaine poisoning

ptomaine domain

Any place that serves particularly disgusting, putrid, or inedible food. ("Ptomaine" refers to amines or alkaloids produced by putrefying organic matter, typically animal tissue. Used in reference especially the dining facility of institutions such as schools or military barracks.) I would avoid that restaurant at all costs—it's a real ptomaine domain.
See also: domain, ptomaine

ptomaine palace

Any place that serves particularly disgusting, putrid, or inedible food. ("Ptomaine" refers to amines or alkaloids produced by putrefying organic matter, typically animal tissue. Used in reference especially the dining facility of institutions such as schools or military barracks.) I would avoid that restaurant at all costs—it's a real ptomaine palace
See also: palace, ptomaine

ptomaine-domain

and ptomaine-palace (ˈtoˈmen...)
n. any institutional dining facility; a mess hall; a cafeteria. Welcome to the ptomaine-domain. Help yourself to some mystery meat. Time to go over to the ptomaine-palace and eat—if you can call it that.

ptomaine-palace

verb
References in periodicals archive ?
Harding died of an embolism while recovering from an attack of ptomaine poisoning and pneumonia, but there were rumors of foul play at the time.
He and my other outdoor cronies won't let me near the cookstove, and for good reason--20 miles from nowhere is not a good place to come down with ptomaine.
"Ptomaine poisoning," by the way, is an outmoded term once used to describe gastroenteritis supposedly caused by toxic substances produced in decaying food.
The White House physician diagnosed the problem as ptomaine poisoning that Harding had gotten from eating crabmeat.
(1921), and Carolyn Wells burlesqued it in Ptomaine Street, The Tale of Warble Petticoat (1921).
BD BDELLIUM CN CNEMIAL CT CTENOID KL KLEPTOMANIA KR KRYPTON MN MNEMONIC PN PNEUMONIA PT PTOMAINE TM TMESIS "But modern English has .become very cosmopolitan, welcoming foreign words to such an extent that the 43 native opening consonant pairs are actually outnumbered by 47 immigrant pairs from 25 foreign languages (including modern German and a U.S.
6, and Buckley might well be advised to come down with the flu, or ptomaine poisoning, or something along those lines so he doesn't have to play that night.
Dans En rade (1887), est racontee la fascination du protagoniste Jacques Marles devant la decouverte du professeur italien Selmi, decouverte, "dans la putrefaction des cadavres, [d'] un alcaloide, la ptomaine, qui se presente a l'etat d'huile incolore et repand une lente mais tenace odeur d'aubepine, de musc, de Criligat, de fleur d'oranger ou de rose" (182-83).
In the ensuing weeks, we listened to talks about escaping from quicksand, ptomaine poisoning, tennis elbow, and encounters with a sasquatch.