psycho

(redirected from psychos)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.

psycho

1. adjective, offensive slang A shortening of "psychopathic," used generally to mean crazy or mentally unstable and likely to engage in harmful antisocial behavior. I still get weird phone calls from my psycho ex-boyfriend from time to time. I had a real psycho professor last year who used to scream and shout at us throughout the lecture.
2. noun, offensive slang A shortening of "psychopath," used generally to mean a crazy or mentally unstable person, typically one who engages in harmful antisocial behavior. Don't be such a psycho—if you don't want something, just say so, don't throw it across the room at me! You've got to be careful at night, man—a lot of psychos out there.
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

psycho

n. a psychopathic person; a crazy person. Pat is turning into a real psycho.
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
See also:
References in periodicals archive ?
But identifying your psycho colleagues have just got a whole lot easier with the publication of Kevin Dutton's new book.
WHEN looking out for a workplace psycho, beware of those who:
PSYCHOS is a reasonable portrayal of ward life in an acute psychiatric ward.
Psychos raises important issues about mental health, including the fact that doctors can suffer from mental illness, too.
But it is Psychos - directed by the man behind Cracker, Andy Wilson - which is causing immediate offence.
"We are very concerned that Channel 4 has chosen to use the word Psychos as the title for a series about mental health patients."
He laid emphasis on evidence based interventions to manage these patients suffering from psycho trauma and referred to NICE guidelines.
Rana and said that we need to have some structural changes because of psycho trauma as it has now become a public health problem.
The relevance of Psycho to an analysis of the violence of mid-century American culture becomes clear when the film is examined in the context of three sociological documents that make an overt attempt to explore American culture of the times: the first, published ten years before Psycho, David Riesman's The Lonely Crowd (initially appearing in 1949); the second, published in 1959 as Hitchcock was making Psycho, C.
PSYCHO: THE CRITICAL RESPONSE TO THE FILM'S VIOLENCE
In a recent article in Harper's Bazaar, Bret Easton Ellis looked back on his original American Psycho experience and revealed that the novel was his response to the stranglehold that political correctness had on late-'80s culture, which "may have nudged me into exploring the repressed, darker side of Patrick Bateman to an even more gruesome degree than I initially thought when I began the book." In fact, that nudge, and Ellis's tenable excitement, fear, and shock as nudge skids into psychosexual freefall, mixed with his ability to maintain equilibrium via the distanced, ironic, quasi-superficial prose style that is his trademark, is not only the novel's genius but its raison d'etre.
Given all that, Harron's American Psycho is as successful as could have been expected.