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full of beans

1. Nonsensical. His explanation is totally full of beans and doesn't answer the question at all.
2. Very energetic. Whenever my daughter is full of beans, I have her run around and play in our back yard.
See also: bean, full, of

full of prunes

Nonsensical. From the idea that prunes cause gas (and being "full of hot air" is synonymous with "nonsensical"). His explanation is totally full of prunes and doesn't answer the question at all.
See also: full, of, prune

prune (something) of (something else)

To make something more trim, clean, or neat by pruning away that which is superfluous, undesirable, or unnecessary. I want to prune the tree outside of its dead and overgrown branches. As your career evolves, you'll need to start pruning your résumé of less relevant work experience.
See also: of, prune

prune away

To remove something superfluous, undesirable, or unnecessary (from something else). A noun or pronoun can be used between "prune" and "away." We need to prune away these dead branches to allow the tree to grow new ones in their place. As your career evolves, you'll need to start pruning less relevant work experience away from your résumé.
See also: away, prune

prune off

To remove something superfluous, undesirable, or unnecessary (from something else). A noun or pronoun can be used between "prune" and "off." We need to prune off these dead branches to allow the tree to grow new ones in their place. As your career evolves, you'll need to start pruning less relevant work experience off your résumé.
See also: off, prune

prunes and prisms

Intentionally formal or prudish speech or action. The phrase originated in Charles Dickens' novel Little Dorrit as an example of proper speech. When you talk to your grandmother, stick to prunes and prisms so that you don't offend her. If you want to become a proper lady, be sure to practice your prunes and prisms.
See also: and, prune

prune something away

to cut away something unwanted or unneeded. Please prune the lower branches of the trees away. They are starting to annoy pedestrians. We pruned away the dead branches.
See also: away, prune

prune something of something

to clear, clean, or groom something of something by pruning. Sally was out in the orchard pruning the apple trees of dead branches. They pruned the roses of their unneeded branches.
See also: of, prune

prune something off (of) something

 and prune something off
to cut something off something. (Of is usually retained before pronouns.) Claire pruned the dead branch off the apple tree. She pruned off the dead branch.
See also: off, prune

full of beans

1. Lively, energetic, in high spirits, as in The children were full of beans today, looking forward to their field trip. This expression has no valid explanation. [c. 1840]
2. Also, full of prunes. Acting foolish, talking nonsense, as in One cup of coffee won't hurt you-you're full of prunes. [c. 1930] Also see full of crap.
See also: bean, full, of

full of beans

If you are full of beans, you are very happy and energetic. Jem was among them, pink-cheeked and full of beans after his long sleep. He's a likable extrovert, full of beans. Note: This originally referred to a horse that was well-fed and therefore full of energy.
See also: bean, full, of

full of beans

lively; in high spirits. informal
This phrase was originally used by people who work with horses, and referred to the good condition of a horse fed on beans.
See also: bean, full, of

prunes and prisms

used to denote a prim and affected speech, look, or manner.
In Charles Dickens's Little Dorrit ( 1857 ), Mrs General advocates speaking this phrase aloud in order to give ‘a pretty form to the lips’.
See also: and, prune

full of ˈbeans

very lively, active and healthy: Ray is certainly full of beans again after his illness.This phrase was originally used to talk about horses that were fed on beans.
See also: bean, full, of

full of beans

mod. full of nonsense; full of hot air. Oh, be quiet. You’re just full of beans.
See also: bean, full, of

full of prunes

mod. full of nonsense. (see also full of beans. Prunes can cause gas = hot air = nonsense.) You’re just silly. Completely full of prunes.
See also: full, of, prune

full of beans

1. Energetic; frisky: The children were too full of beans to sit still.
2. Badly mistaken: Don't believe him; he's full of beans.
See also: bean, full, of

full of beans

Lively, high-spirited. The earliest appearance of this expression is in Robert Smith Surtees’s Handley Cross (1843), a continuation of the adventures of a sporting grocer, John Jorrocks (“Ounds, ’osses and men are in a glorious state of excitement! Full o’ beans and benevolence!”). A slang dictionary of 1874 defined the term to mean arrogant and offensive concerning one’s newfound prosperity (nouveau riche snobbery) and held that it came from stable slang. It was so used for a time in the late nineteenth century, but then was superseded by the earlier (and present) meaning, which survives in the cliché.
See also: bean, full, of
References in periodicals archive ?
Comparison of yearly tree development in unpruned and pruned Howard walnut trees.
Tallest plants (141.87cm) were produced in T2 (pruned on 31 December) followed by T5 (pruned on 15 February) which gave height of 139.57 cm (Table 1).
All pruned vines were within the optimal range; non-pruned vines were below the optimal range and thus considered out of balance.
Unless the plant already has three or four healthy stems growing from the base, all newly planted clematis should be pruned back hard the first spring after planting.
Hedges may be pruned several times during the growing season to avoid a shaggy appearance.
Rejuvenation pruning is used on shrubs that have not been pruned properly and have stopped flowering.
Summer-flowering shrubs such as buddleja flower on new season's growth and if not pruned annually tend to become too leggy with flowers above eye level.
You also need to keep newly planted trees watered and pruned, and keep weeds away from their bases.
Thinking twice from an economic standpoint means going back over what you've written and making sure you've been as simple as possible, avoided clutter and pruned where you should prune.
Unfortunately, many trees are not trained or pruned properly in the nursery or landscape.
When the randomly pruned data sets had been reduced to 42 remaining taxa, the pruning process was halted.
Pruned trees channel more nutrients into fruit production, rather than excessive foliage.
B shows how growth will occur in the same branch pruned differently.
These can be pruned to within a foot or so of the ground.