prune


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Related to prune: plum, Prune belly syndrome

full of beans

1. Nonsensical. His explanation is totally full of beans and doesn't answer the question at all.
2. Very active and energetic. Whenever my daughter is full of beans like this, I have her go run around in our back yard for a few hours.
See also: bean, full, of

full of prunes

Nonsensical. From the idea that prunes cause gas (and being "full of hot air" is synonymous with "nonsensical"). His explanation is totally full of prunes and doesn't answer the question at all.
See also: full, of, prune

prune (something) of (something else)

To make something more trim, clean, or neat by pruning away that which is superfluous, undesirable, or unnecessary. I want to prune the tree outside of its dead and overgrown branches. As your career evolves, you'll need to start pruning your résumé of less relevant work experience.
See also: of, prune

prune away

To remove something superfluous, undesirable, or unnecessary (from something else). A noun or pronoun can be used between "prune" and "away." We need to prune away these dead branches to allow the tree to grow new ones in their place. As your career evolves, you'll need to start pruning less relevant work experience away from your résumé.
See also: away, prune

prune off

To remove something superfluous, undesirable, or unnecessary (from something else). A noun or pronoun can be used between "prune" and "off." We need to prune off these dead branches to allow the tree to grow new ones in their place. As your career evolves, you'll need to start pruning less relevant work experience off your résumé.
See also: off, prune

prunes and prisms

Intentionally formal or prudish speech or action. The phrase originated in Charles Dickens' novel Little Dorrit as an example of proper speech. When you talk to your grandmother, stick to prunes and prisms so that you don't offend her. If you want to become a proper lady, be sure to practice your prunes and prisms.
See also: and, prune
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

prune something away

to cut away something unwanted or unneeded. Please prune the lower branches of the trees away. They are starting to annoy pedestrians. We pruned away the dead branches.
See also: away, prune

prune something of something

to clear, clean, or groom something of something by pruning. Sally was out in the orchard pruning the apple trees of dead branches. They pruned the roses of their unneeded branches.
See also: of, prune

prune something off (of) something

 and prune something off
to cut something off something. (Of is usually retained before pronouns.) Claire pruned the dead branch off the apple tree. She pruned off the dead branch.
See also: off, prune
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

full of beans

1. Lively, energetic, in high spirits, as in The children were full of beans today, looking forward to their field trip. This expression has no valid explanation. [c. 1840]
2. Also, full of prunes. Acting foolish, talking nonsense, as in One cup of coffee won't hurt you-you're full of prunes. [c. 1930] Also see full of crap.
See also: bean, full, of
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

full of beans

If you are full of beans, you are very happy and energetic. Jem was among them, pink-cheeked and full of beans after his long sleep. He's a likable extrovert, full of beans. Note: This originally referred to a horse that was well-fed and therefore full of energy.
See also: bean, full, of
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

full of beans

lively; in high spirits. informal
This phrase was originally used by people who work with horses, and referred to the good condition of a horse fed on beans.
See also: bean, full, of

prunes and prisms

used to denote a prim and affected speech, look, or manner.
In Charles Dickens's Little Dorrit ( 1857 ), Mrs General advocates speaking this phrase aloud in order to give ‘a pretty form to the lips’.
See also: and, prune
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

full of ˈbeans

very lively, active and healthy: Ray is certainly full of beans again after his illness.This phrase was originally used to talk about horses that were fed on beans.
See also: bean, full, of
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

full of beans

mod. full of nonsense; full of hot air. Oh, be quiet. You’re just full of beans.
See also: bean, full, of

full of prunes

mod. full of nonsense. (see also full of beans. Prunes can cause gas = hot air = nonsense.) You’re just silly. Completely full of prunes.
See also: full, of, prune
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

full of beans

1. Energetic; frisky: The children were too full of beans to sit still.
2. Badly mistaken: Don't believe him; he's full of beans.
See also: bean, full, of
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

full of beans

Lively, high-spirited. The earliest appearance of this expression is in Robert Smith Surtees’s Handley Cross (1843), a continuation of the adventures of a sporting grocer, John Jorrocks (“Ounds, ’osses and men are in a glorious state of excitement! Full o’ beans and benevolence!”). A slang dictionary of 1874 defined the term to mean arrogant and offensive concerning one’s newfound prosperity (nouveau riche snobbery) and held that it came from stable slang. It was so used for a time in the late nineteenth century, but then was superseded by the earlier (and present) meaning, which survives in the cliché.
See also: bean, full, of
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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References in periodicals archive ?
Other companies that sell preservative free or organic prunes, sell their product at low moisture to prevent molding.
"If you do know the plant name, you can easily find out how to prune on the RHS website (rhs.org.uk)."
The cook and author has teamed up with California Prunes to come up with some tasty prune-based dishes.
The participants in the study were divided into two groups - those who ate prunes every day (140g a day for women and 171g a day for men) and those who were given advice on healthy snacks over the period of active weight loss.
"Working with a food industry professional of the calibre of paul.a.young, is very exciting and we are very proud to be able to continue our relationship with him," said Esther Ritson-Elliott, California Prune Board's European Marketing Director.
Atrophied into a weakened condition, they no longer have the luxury to prune; they are forced to slash in a way that impedes revenue growth.
Now is the time to prune summer-flowering clematis, the Group 2 types, which bloom on stems produced in the current season.
To avoid this unsightly, counterproductive reactionary growth, it's necessary to prune trees using lateral-reduction cuts.
I have heard from some gardeners that it is hard for them to prune without the foliage because they cannot picture how the tree will look without the leaves.
There are some general rules about when to prune, and some specific rules for certain plants.
All the basics of when and how to prune are revealed in a guide which teaches best practices.
The health benefits of prune juice may appeal to more consumers with the release of Old Orchard Brands' Healthy Balance Prune juice cocktail.
Prune plants to regulate their size without affecting their natural beauty.
I'm trying to find out the best time to prune pine trees but am getting varying and conflicting advice.
No matter what approach you take, sometimes you just have to prune your plants.