provoke (one) to

(redirected from provoking us to)

provoke (one) to

1. To incite, stir, or induce one to take some action. You shouldn't have let the boss provoke you to quit—now you won't be entitled to any severance pay! They provoked me to retaliate, which gave them the justification they needed to arrest me.
2. To incite, stir, or induce one to some hostile or incensed emotional state or response. Her words at the funeral provoked me to anger. Do not provoke the lord of the manor to wrath.
See also: provoke, to
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.
See also:
References in periodicals archive ?
Umdenken, which aims to raise awareness of environmental themes, addresses the four elements -- fire, air, water and earth -- by provoking us to think about how we treat nature.
Invariably the artist is provoking us to analyze and think about the method of presenting an emotion or idea, rather than the idea itself.
"My thanks to Doctor Who for letting us borrow a couple of actors, provoking us to send up the Daleks by sticking a sink plunger on a talking dustbin, and for giving us hours and hours of pleasure.
But he's very much in evidence, directly addressing the actor through his script then us, his unseen audience, provoking us to think about what kind of people we are (do we follow instructions or stand apart; are we a "red rabbit" or a "white rabbit"?) and the sort of society where theatre is policed.
But the seeds of hatred sowed in our psyche provoking us to butcher humanity.
Because she ranges so freely over fascinating ground, picking up and inspecting shiny nuggets wherever she finds them, Torgovnick serves as a kind of quirky and compelling guide on a walking tour of popular memory, drawing us in with her enthusiasm for her subject, and provoking us to notice--and to think deeply about--the cultural and literary landscape of the post-World War II era.
Because she ranges so freely over fascinating ground, picking up and inspecting shiny nuggets wherever she finds them, Torgovnick serves as a kind of quirky and compelling guide on a walking tour of popular memory, drawing us in with her enthusiasm for her subject and provoking us to notice--and to think deeply about--the cultural and literary landscape of the post-World War II era.