provoke (one) to

(redirected from provokes us to)

provoke (one) to

1. To incite, stir, or induce one to take some action. You shouldn't have let the boss provoke you to quit—now you won't be entitled to any severance pay! They provoked me to retaliate, which gave them the justification they needed to arrest me.
2. To incite, stir, or induce one to some hostile or incensed emotional state or response. Her words at the funeral provoked me to anger. Do not provoke the lord of the manor to wrath.
See also: provoke
References in periodicals archive ?
She is not only original, but also provokes us to think about religion (which can be a very controversial topic) and its place in the modern world.
"Before your anti-people role provokes us to initiate a comprehensive boycott, we once again beseech you to quit this treacherous role, resign and come back to people.
Will Shannon's The Closet Craftsman work addresses themes of sustainable production and provokes us to think about how, where and why things are made, sourcing materials locally, making use of discarded objects and materials.
"Voices Against the Darkness" provokes us to confront a truly global network of carceral spaces in the present.
His discussion provokes us to explore the complicated role of real-time music making in an environment that allows players, working with their avatars, to forge alternate strategies of self-expression
What provokes us to create, to behold beauty, and to grasp meaning in the struggle?
Insistently and sometimes annoyingly, she provokes us to decode its connotations.
Wordsworth provokes us to think again - and though he expected the 'tramp' to be a passing image - he has something to say to politicians, and the rest of us, who lightly pass people by as 'refuse' to be swept away.
Randall, but it provokes us to contemplate the unique historical context and actions of a democratic-minded president who, albeit a bold and forceful commander in chief, probably would be appalled at our current practice of treating presidential executive orders as if they had the force of law and horrified at our post-World War II willingness to let presidents wage war with no more than a fig leaf of congressional approval.