protect against (someone or something)

(redirected from protected us against)

protect against (someone or something)

1. To guard, defend, or inoculate against someone or something. This vaccine protects against the flu for the entire winter. We need to invest in top-of-the-line security software to protect against cyber attacks. The walls of the encampment were fortified and lined with spears to protect against invaders.
2. To guard, defend, or inoculate someone, something, or oneself against someone or something else. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "protect" and "against." I know you want to protect your kids against injury, but you can't keep them cut off from the real world either. Tourists are being advised to protect themselves against pickpockets in the city center.
See also: protect

protect someone or something against someone or something

 and protect someone or something from someone or something
to shield or preserve someone or something against someone or something. Please come along and protect us against muggers as we walk home. What will protect my car against thieves?
See also: protect
References in classic literature ?
de Chagny and I had repeatedly taken off our coats and put them on again, finding at one time that they made us feel still hotter and at another that they protected us against the heat.
"Flintshire County Council's investment into affordable housing, and the pledge by the Welsh Assembly to invest PS120m into a North Wales Growth Deal has provided businesses with certainty in uncertain times and protected us against the worst excesses of the UK Government's policies.
We hedged our investment in the Turkish subsidiary's capital three years ago; a move which protected us against the current depreciation in the Turkish Lira.
Britain protected us against an American invasion, and with our voyageurs we demonstrated the value of having Canada in the British Empire.
In a timely entry, Carano points out that the Geneva Convention "protected us against the atrocities inflicted against other nationalities." Entries include drawings, poems, escape letters, and retorts against those back home who berated them for getting captured.
The consequential abandonment of the law of 'habeas corpus', the right to trial by jury, the presumption of innocence and all the other features of British common law, which have traditionally protected us against coercion by an overweening state, will take us back to the dark ages when false accusation, arbitrary arrest and wrongful imprisonment were the order of the day.