prospect for

prospect for (something)

1. To carry out an exploration for some kind of natural resource, especially mineral deposits or oil. We've been prospecting for gold in these mountains for months, but we've come away with little more than a few flecks. Thousands of people rushed to the area to begin prospecting for natural shale gas.
2. To explore a particular region for some kind of natural resource, especially mineral deposits or oil. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "prospect" and "for." The company has begun prospecting an area a few miles off the coastline for oil. I'm prospecting this part of the mountain for cobalt.
See also: prospect

prospect for something

to search for something, especially for metals or minerals. The old men said they were prospecting for gold. What are they prospecting for out in the desert?
See also: prospect
References in periodicals archive ?
Senior Loan Officer and top Loan Officer of Quarter 1, Jessie Beckett, has also been with Prospect for three years.
Hunter, a consultant, coach, and speaker who has worked in sales and helps individuals and companies identify better prospects and build profitable customer relationships, shows salespeople how to prospect for customers.
When you call a prospect for the first time, the purpose of your call is not to find out how your prospect is feeling.
Given the high rate of failed pitching prospects, it could definitely be worth giving a top pitching prospect for an established player, even with the high price that pitchers cost on the open market.
It makes more sense to use the total breakeven WARP as the breakeven figure since prospect for prospect trades rarely happen.
11 Someone entering the insurance or financial planning business must either have access to a clientele by working with a long-term agent, or have a natural market of people to prospect, or figure out how she is going to prospect for quality clients.