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of biblical proportions

Of a huge or catastrophic size, magnitude, or severity. The typhoon laid waste to the coast of Japan, causing damage of biblical proportions. An evacuation of biblical proportions has been underway since the civil war began.
See also: biblical, of, proportion

blown (all) out of proportion

Exaggerated or magnified beyond the true scale or truth of the matter. It was just a minor tremor, not even a proper earthquake, but the media has it blown all out of proportion. These reports on the crime rate are blown out of proportion, if you ask me.
See also: blown, of, out, proportion

blow (something) up out of proportion

To indicate, imply, or argue that something is more important or consequential than it really is; to overinflate the importance of something. Don't blow this up out of proportion, Bill—I was late due to traffic, and that's it. It's just a small inconvenience, don't blow it up out of proportion and make it sound like the end of the world.
See also: blow, of, out, proportion, up

blow (something) out of (all) proportion

To make something seem more important, negative, or significant than it really is; to exaggerate something or focus unnecessary attention on something. I'm sure he didn't mean anything by that comment—don't blow it out of proportion. Of course she's mad at me because I didn't call her back—you can always count on my mom to blow something out of all proportion!
See also: blow, of, out, proportion

a disaster of epic proportions

A catastrophe. Often used figuratively. Meteorologists have been predicting that the hurricane will be a disaster of epic proportions for us because we're so close to the coast. Oh, my attempt to ask Addison to the dance was a disaster of epic proportions—I could only squeak out a few incoherent words before turning completely red and running away.
See also: disaster, epic, of, proportion

keep (something) in proportion

To refrain from regarding or depicting something in an exaggerated or overblown manner; to not regard or depict something as more important, negative, or significant than it really is. I know we're all shocked by the announcement, but let's try to keep it in proportion—no one is losing their job, and no one is getting a decrease in pay. In reality, it's just a rearrangement of responsibilities. In the age of social media, people seem incapable of keeping current events in proportion.
See also: keep, proportion

out of proportion

Not the correct size or scale in relation to other things. The crime rate in this city is way out of proportion to its population size. It was just a minor tremor, not even a proper earthquake, but the media has it blown all out of proportion.
See also: of, out, proportion

disaster of epic proportions

Cliché a very large disaster. (Often jocular.) The earthquake was responsible for a disaster of epic proportions. Your late arrival caused a disaster of epic proportions.
See also: disaster, epic, of, proportion

in proportion

showing the correct size or proportion relative to something else. That man's large head is not in proportion to his small body. The cartoonist drew the dog in proportion to its surroundings.
See also: proportion

*out of (all) proportion

of exaggerated importance; of an unrealistic importance or size compared to something else. (*Typically: be ~; blow something ~; grow ~.) Thisproblem has grown out of all proportion. Yes, this figure is way out of proportion to the others in the painting.
See also: of, out, proportion

out of proportion

Also, out of all proportion. Not in proper relation to other things, especially by being the wrong size or amount. For example, This vase looks out of proportion on this small table, or Her emotional response was out of all proportion to the circumstances. The noun proportion means "an agreeable or harmonious relationship of one thing relative to another." [Early 1700s] The antonym in proportion dates from the late 1600s and also refers either to physical size or appropriate degree, as in The bird's wings are huge in proportion to its body, or Her willingness to believe him stands in direct proportion to her love for intrigue.
See also: of, out, proportion

ˌkeep something in proˈportion

react to something in a sensible way and not think it is worse or more serious than it really is: Listen, I know you’re all upset but let’s try to keep things in proportion, shall we?

out of (all) proˈportion (to something)

greater or more important, serious, etc. than it really is or should be: When you’re depressed, it’s very easy to get things out of proportion.The punishment is out of all proportion to the crime.
See also: of, out, proportion

blow out of proportion

To make more of than is reasonable; exaggerate.
See also: blow, of, out, proportion
References in periodicals archive ?
At the beginning of 2011, 17 domestic banks posted 40%-plus home mortgage lending proportion, which dropped to only two at the end of October: Standard Chartered Bank, Taiwan and Hongkong & Shanghai Banking Corp.
2 : a balanced or pleasing arrangement <The oversize garage is out of proportion with the house.>
(5) Between 1991 and 2007, the proportions of Hispanic students who had ever had sex, who had had four or more lifetime sexual partners and who had been taught about AIDS or HIV in school were stable.
An arrangement of teeth in Golden Proportion would yield relative widths of 1.618 : 1.0 : 0.618 for the central incisor, lateral incisor, and canine respectively.
In the study, the Z-test (4) is applied to test differences between two proportions within two sample years at the 0.05 level of significance.
brizantha, Clone 95 and Clone 97 (with higher parenchyma proportions) and Clone 1 (with higher phloem proportions) showing larger proportions of tissues with higher digestibility potential.
Both groups of enterprises reported hard-to-fill vacancies of at least half the proportions for recruiting ICT specialists (27 % for large enterprises, 4 % for SMEs).
An assessment of current voter registration statistics against provisional data of the Housing and Population Census 2017 reveals widespread regional disparity in the proportions of population and registered voters.
Dimensions of maxillary anterior teeth are effected by many factors like: sexual dimorphism, ethnic background, genetics, and environment, so it may vary significantly from person to person.3 So it is better to quantify the relationship between these dimensions by geometric proportions several theories have suggested to relate teeth dimensions to each other, such as golden proportion, recurring esthetic dental proportion (RED), and golden percentage.4
Nowadays, aesthetic dental variables like proportion, symmetry, harmony and dominance (dependent from teeth size, form and position), have been reexamined by several researchers that have proposed models in an attempt to explain a universal beauty for teeth proportions.
The Recipe Effect references the interplay between feeding accuracy and recipe proportions, and has everything to do with the fact that feeding accuracy is based on the flow rate of an individual ingredient, whereas recipe proportions (and their associated statistically based Q/A tolerance limits) reference the total formulation stream.
Geronimus and Korenman (1992) find that urban areas tend to have larger proportions of teen mothers.
Using Demographic and Health Surveys and similar national surveys for developing nations, the researchers tabulated the proportions of women who were using modern methods to avoid pregnancy and those who had unmet need.